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Can you feel the connective tensions in your body? And do you apply that to your therapy?

Hi everyone! I'm Norio Tomita, a Japanese native who now lives in Montreal and I'm glad to communicate with you here.

Since I became therapist, I've been working hard to analyze and find the physical reasons of latest Japanese osteopathic techniques. For example, in case of lower back pain, some therapists take care of from only a few points on the legs.

Of course, I found some explanations in the book "Anatomy Train", but I personally feel more specific lines in my body, and it seems more similar to the Chinese meridian muscles (Jing-jin, which are different from acupuncture meridians).

I talked with some therapists about that, but most of them know the myofacsial connections just as approximate knowledge but don't actually sense them as real lines in their own body.
Then I learned that they call people like me as being "meridian sensitive".

If some of you are interested, we could share about this topic.

Also, I'll be in NY in October to give my professional courses and if you are around, why not meet up !

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In addition, and I'm talking about my own personal approach to pain relief and therapy, not anyone elses. I don't think in terms of Ki or chi. The distinction between meridians , backlines, Jing Jin ,and so on, are just details that are irrelevant to my work. And I want to emphasize "my work." Not telling anybody what to think or do.
Yea you're right Pueppi, I'm working on the physical muscular level. To me, meridians are just lines that represent the muscle chains. So I can look at a Jing Jin chart or a meridian chat and it doesn't matter( for my work). In other words, for my Holographic Acupressure, meridian charts are just representations of muscle chains or Jing Jin chains. My work may look like energy work , but what I do is definitely not energy work.
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Gordon J. Wallis said:

Yea you're right Pueppi, I'm working on the physical muscular level. To me, meridians are just lines that represent the muscle chains. So I can look at a Jing Jin chart or a meridian chat and it doesn't matter( for my work). In other words, for my Holographic Acupressure, meridian charts are just representations of muscle chains or Jing Jin chains. My work may look like energy work , but what I do is definitely not energy work.
Gordon,

If I could make a suggestion.  You are regularly using documentation and terminology (specifically with acupuncture points) to represent the way in which you work. 

If you don't think any of the acupuncture charts (meridian, Jing Jin or otherwise) matter in your work, then I would suggest that you not use those descriptions in chart or other formats to represent your particular concepts for your newly formed style of bodywork.  It is confusing and in the end, misrepresents your work (as does the name you have chosen "Holographic Acupressure" which would suggest to other bodyworkers that you are indeed working with the meridians in a direct way).

Surely there must be a different way to professionally discuss your unique style of work, without pulling bits and peices of from a centuries old healing method to represent your work, when you don't even feel it matters.

What I do is meridian based. The points are important. It's that using a Jing Jin chart or a meridian chart, makes no difference.. I look at meridian charts all day long. That's why I posted a Jing Jin chart and a meridian chart in the attachments.
I don't mean to be confusing. I developed this system, and it won't make sense until I explain how it works in totality . And I don't want to do that online here. I'm going to be making a DVD hopefully within a year that will clearly explain what I'm doing, and how to do it. Sorry for any confusion. I guess you could say I'm using the Jing Jin channels. But all I need is an acupuncture chart. This is a Jing Jin Chart in the attachment. I can use that or an acupuncture chart. I depend on those charts. At the same time what I'm doing is in no way shape or form what is being taught as Acupressure. So I called it Holographic Acupressure.
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Gordon J. Wallis said:

What I do is meridian based. The points are important. It's that using a Jing Jin chart or a meridian chart, makes no difference.. I look at meridian charts all day long. That's why I posted a Jing Jin chart and a meridian chart in the attachments. <snip>
I don't mean to be confusing. <snip>
I guess you could say I'm using the Jing Jin channels. But all I need is an acupuncture chart. This is a Jing Jin Chart in the attachment. I can use that or an acupuncture chart. I depend on those charts.

Ahhh!  Now I understand!  ;)

Gordon, thank you to share your sense and theory. Im really glad to know people like you who sense the connection and apply it logically to your treatment. Pueppi, thank you for your arrangement of terminology.

To me also, the name of lines doesnt matter either. I want to find the points to treat effectively in the connection of the tension. I thought Jing Jin seems to represent it more precisely than Anatomy Train. But even though, I personally feel that there are more lines at both sides of all fingers and toes, so I think even Jing Jin doesnt cover everything.

The merit to sense such lines are, as I wrote last time,

  1. we dont need to touch the point of symptom/pain
  2. we dont need to push nor massage the muscles

When I scan the tension of my client, what I am aware of

  1. the farther point from symptom/pain works more effectively
  2. such points of care are on the bone edges or the part of the bone that is convex-shaped. Some induration are there around those convex parts. Once I release the induration, the tension decreases along that whole line.

In the case of Achilles tendon, I treat the toes and the base of the toes at first. If the tension doesnt decrease enough, then I try to find other points along the « TaiYang »-like line. The ischium bone edge, the groove of the sacroiliac joint, the rib bone edges, and the entire head. The physical relation between the neck flexibility and the ankle/wrist flexibility is well known in Japanese Seitai. So I agree with the C1 point that Gordon mentioned. I may scratch the whole back of the head to release the sticking myofascia on the back head bone to release C1, because I feel a strong connection between them.

Any more, I rarely do what would be considered massage therapy. It's my version of Acupressure. Like you, I'm manipulating tissue far distal from the actual site of pain itself. It's cool, and highly effective. But I'm not un-sticking muscle or fascia at the distal point. I'm stimulating a neurological Reflex from that distal area that relaxes the tissues in the area of pain. I have maybe 20 different release points for any given pain area.
I plan on teaching my system at some point. In a year maybe?
I think this kinda fits into this thread? I’ve always thought the Qii chi energy thing of acupuncture and meridians a bit Hard to really accept. As Norio stated, he is working on a physical level. I too. I’m working with meridians, but it’s definitely working with sinew channels ( muscle chains ) , not some mysterious qi energy thing. I know some, or maybe a lot will disagree with me, and that’s ok. But after reading a bit of the history of acupuncture, and how it became introduced to the west. All that mysterious qi stuff started from a mistranslation. In the two attachments are some excerpts from a book on the history of Chinese medicine. It’s a little bit long. But in there it says it all.
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