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Another post another interest. I'm wondering what other Therapists across the US are doing to save themselves from injury, all whille still making ends meet.

 

What are the Max # of sessions you'd perform in a day?

 

How would you space those out to safely manage that amt on a daily basis?

 

Does where you work have a certain requirement?

 

  I'm hearing while the ME's of the world say that they allow their MT's to pick and choose their schedule that it's not exactly the case at most locals, since I'm thinking of buying into this industry FYI (NOT Massage Envy) I wanting to get a feel across the board for what other Therapist both in the massage box retial environment, as well as privated business onwers have to say.

 

Thanks

 

Chance   :)=

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9 years:)
My studio hours are Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday 8 AM - 9 PM and Friday and Saturday 8 AM - 6 PM. I schedule my appointments so that each is session time (30-, 45-, 60-, 90-, and 120-minute lengths available) plus 30 minutes (for intake, follow-up, payment, and next appointment) and 30 minutes between sessions. Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday have a maximum of 7 sessions possible, while Friday and Saturday have a maximum of 5.
I work for two establishments, one is a massage franchise and the other is a chiropractic office. On a full day, Saturday, I can work up to three sessions (30, 60, or 80min) at a time then a 30-60 min break and two to three massages. I grab a bite to eat after my shift and usually have one outcall. I average a maximum of six massages every other Saturday. On a late afternoon/evening shift, I work four massage sessions with a 30 min break somewhere in between and average four massages. The chiropractic office is a dual role of massage therapy and office work, originally intended to have a set amount of office hours for a steady check and four increments three times a week for strictly massage time. Clientele is sporadic at best lately, due to a couple of steady clients recovering from surgery and the economy. I do a lot of stretching, drink lots of water, take multi-vitamins, get chiropractic treatments every two weeks, get a massage twice a month, and bring snacks and lunch when possible.
I think this depends greatly on what kind of physical shape the therapist is in, and how well you can maintain your body mechanics. Some therapists like/need a half hour or so break between clients, and others can do perhaps three in a row and then a longer break - maybe 2 hours.
When I was at my busiest (and younger!) I regularly did 6 - 7 one hour massages per day: 3 in a row then a 2 hour break and then 4. I totalled about 28 a week and did that for years.
I never had an injury or a problem.

Now I have slowed down because I am older, and don't want or need to work so much. I do about 15 massages a week - averaging 3 - 4 a day, with a nice break between each massage.
I am fortunate to be self-employed so I can set my own schedule to meet my needs and those of my clients,.

I suggest that new therapists start out easy so that they can build their strength and endurance. Too many new therapists take on a larger client load than they should and they experience repetitive strain injuries.
When applying for a position, find out what the employer's expectations are about numbers per day and scheduling.


lee kalpin said:
I think this depends greatly on what kind of physical shape the therapist is in, and how well you can maintain your body mechanics. Some therapists like/need a half hour or so break between clients, and others can do perhaps three in a row and then a longer break - maybe 2 hours.
When I was at my busiest (and younger!) I regularly did 6 - 7 one hour massages per day: 3 in a row then a 2 hour break and then 4. I totalled about 28 a week and did that for years.
I never had an injury or a problem.

Now I have slowed down because I am older, and don't want or need to work so much. I do about 15 massages a week - averaging 3 - 4 a day, with a nice break between each massage.
I am fortunate to be self-employed so I can set my own schedule to meet my needs and those of my clients,.

I suggest that new therapists start out easy so that they can build their strength and endurance. Too many new therapists take on a larger client load than they should and they experience repetitive strain injuries.
When applying for a position, find out what the employer's expectations are about numbers per day and scheduling.
I also think this depends on how great of shapr the therapist is in, I work at the Massage envy in costa mesa CA, and I do 3 massages then an 60 min break then do 3 more then i'm off. I work tuesday through saturday. and all nights so I have my mornings free to workout which involves weighrtlifting, yoga and other forms of exercise. So I stay in good shape and I'm always self aware of my body mechanics. there is a great book called "BODY MECHANICS FOR THE MANUAL THERAPISTS" By Barbara Frye. It is amazing and really helped. I also get two massages per month as required by my location and I also see a chiropractor once a month to get adjusted. hope this helps.
I agree completely Christopher. Being in good shape when we start the profession, and staying in good shape is absolutely necessary. Several people have posted good suggestions for a fitness program.
That's the other part of the equation, along with good body mechanics, and pacing ourselves in a way that works for each of us.
Therapists should not allow themselves to be pushed into a busier schedule than they can reasonably handle.

Another problem I have seen is therapists who are so anxious to make their fortune, that they over-extend themselves physically. It's far better to pace oneself and be in the profession for the long haul!!



christopher keller said:
I also think this depends on how great of shapr the therapist is in, I work at the Massage envy in costa mesa CA, and I do 3 massages then an 60 min break then do 3 more then i'm off. I work tuesday through saturday. and all nights so I have my mornings free to workout which involves weighrtlifting, yoga and other forms of exercise. So I stay in good shape and I'm always self aware of my body mechanics. there is a great book called "BODY MECHANICS FOR THE MANUAL THERAPISTS" By Barbara Frye. It is amazing and really helped. I also get two massages per month as required by my location and I also see a chiropractor once a month to get adjusted. hope this helps.
I work at a place where i can have no more than 6-1 hour massage a day tues-sat from 10-6. Its recommended that we only have 4-1 hour massages a day, and no more than 20 a week. Schedule atleast 15 minutes between each client so you can give your body a little break. Always do your stretches and ROM of joints to help keep your body in working order.
It seems that the place you work is setting reasonable expectations and being supportive of your self-care.
When we discussed "how many massages in a day" we neglected to talk about "how many in a week".
I agree that 20 is a good number in a week, although an experienced therapist in good shape can probably do more - but not too many more.
I believe it's all a matter of pacing ourselves, and maintaining our exercise and self-care, and taking regular breaks. I congratulate you and your "employer" on setting a good schedule for lasting a long time in the profession.
Another aspect we have not discussed is what other tasks we have to do in our workday. In my clinic, I do my own laundry and cleaning, so this is work in addition to massage. The province where I practice also requires quite extensive record-keeping so this necessarily adds to the workday. It's not demanding physically, but does require additional time. All this must be taken in consideration along with the physical work of doing massage.
I keep at least an hour between appts. and will not usually do over 4 massages in a day. I am a private practice.
And how many days per week/ total clients per week? And what other work do you do around your clinic?




Dan Brownell said:
I keep at least an hour between appts. and will not usually do over 4 massages in a day. I am a private practice.
I don't do more than three massages a day. My case is a bit particular, my co-workers are doing four or five a day but I'm lucky enough to work in a place where the boss is very comprehensive. The minimum between the massages if half an hour and the requirement we have is to be on time and do our best ; )

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