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I'm shopping around for a reliable massage chair. I'm not looking to spend more than $200. Any advice on reliable brands? Not too picky, but I would prefer a chair with wheels.

 

Thanks!!

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The oakworks is a great chair. You can find one used for around $200
I took my time shopping for a chair. I am tall and most chairs are made for short therapists. I explored them all. I listened one evening to a webinar from the designer of the Stronglite ERGO-PRO and was impressed. This chair is on wheels, very lite weight, sets up easily. It also is adjustable so I can raise it up for my comfort level because I am tall. Saves my back. The money I spent was a great investment in my self care. Because of the webinar I was able to receive a discounted price. The price is normally over $300. Looking at it from a self care perspective "priceless". I love it and am glad I waited and saved and bought the best.
I just bought the Endure Massage chair from salonguys.com 69.99 total including shipping. I am very pleased with it. It is sturdy, well built, only 24# and very easy to set up and take down. The chest pad has indentions on it for breasts and belly and is very comfortable. It is an aluminum frame and The oakworks chairs from school were ok, but a bit cumbersome and awkward to carry and breaking down took some getting used to.

My initial idea was to get a decent, cheap chair to get started and upgrade to one of the more expensive ones later, but I really do like this chair and at this point, see no need of upgrading later. :D And it came with a lifetime warranty so if anything does go wrong, they will fix/replace.

Below are the specs are the chair I just got. :D


Luxurious, strong, silent and secure – this massage chair with carrying bag, is hands down our top model. A classic beauty with unparalleled strength, the Endure outperforms all others. The super lightweight aluminum frame ensures stability and portability. When you see the beauty and feel the superior quality of this table you'll know why. The Endure features a three-inch foam face and comfort chest pad cushion that suits all body types. The Endure also comes with a sturdy carrying case and an arm sling and folds for easy transport and storage. The Endure weighs only 24 lbs, yet can support up to 350 pounds of working weight, and is adjustable to fit your personal needs.

Features:
3" inch foam face cushion / chest.
Weighs 24lbs.
Supports up to 350lbs.
Folds for easy transport and storage.
Adjustable to fit your personal needs.
Super light weight aluminum frame.
Comfort Shaped Chest Pad suits various body types.
Carrying Case.

Dimensions:
Height: 39"
Length:28"
Width: 13"
Headrest outer: 12" x 11"
Headrest inner: 3" x 6"
I use the NRG Grasshopper chair (purchased at Massage Warehouse) and have not had any problems with it. For under $200 it really is not a bad product for the money. Lightweight, sturdy for clients, and easy to carry. Took a few trial and error moves to figure out how to adjust it because there wasn't any instructions, other than that...no complaints.
I've been doing corporate/convention massage for 10 years. I use the Earthlite Avila II. It is an exceptional chair and the customer service at Earthlite has been exemplary. I think it and the Oakworks chair are the best 2.

I have a few clients over 6'6'' tall and in the range of 300 lbs. No hesitation in putting them in my chair. My chair is sturdy and well built.

I would be very hesitant to put these clients in a lightweight aluminum chair that costs 69.99. In my opinion, you get what you pay for. Hypothetical question. If you have a large person in your chair and it breaks while doing compression on the middle back (it could cause tipping over...I've seen it happen) and the client gets hurt.....does it really matter if the company says they will fix anything that goes wrong? Will they pay for the costs incurred by you when you're sued? Does having a "sturdy carrying case" matter if the chair doesn't hold up? Not being negative here....but these are serious questions to ask. Maybe you've already had a few large people in your chair already and nothing happened.....do you know if there is a point when the aluminum goes fatigue on you and collapses? My Avila had a part go fatigue on me.....if I would've had a client in my chair, they would've gotten hurt. Earthlite fixed it (a design flaw in a part) with metal, not plastic or aluminum.

At least the Grasshopper is a step up. To me, my profession dictates that I get the best equipment possible.
Hi,
I have an Avila II, and I have found it to be cumbersome to put up and take down, not to mention all of the adjustments that need to be made. I didn't really know anything about massage chairs when I bought it, and might have made a different choice if I had. I am wondering how you deal with all of the adjustments and stuff when using your Avila II. Would you be willing to give me some hints? I have actually stopped taking it out because of these issues. Any suggestions you can give would help.

Thanks!
Ginger

Choice Kinchen said:
I've been doing corporate/convention massage for 10 years. I use the Earthlite Avila II. It is an exceptional chair and the customer service at Earthlite has been exemplary. I think it and the Oakworks chair are the best 2.

I have a few clients over 6'6'' tall and in the range of 300 lbs. No hesitation in putting them in my chair. My chair is sturdy and well built.

I would be very hesitant to put these clients in a lightweight aluminum chair that costs 69.99. In my opinion, you get what you pay for. Hypothetical question. If you have a large person in your chair and it breaks while doing compression on the middle back (it could cause tipping over...I've seen it happen) and the client gets hurt.....does it really matter if the company says they will fix anything that goes wrong? Will they pay for the costs incurred by you when you're sued? Does having a "sturdy carrying case" matter if the chair doesn't hold up? Not being negative here....but these are serious questions to ask. Maybe you've already had a few large people in your chair already and nothing happened.....do you know if there is a point when the aluminum goes fatigue on you and collapses? My Avila had a part go fatigue on me.....if I would've had a client in my chair, they would've gotten hurt. Earthlite fixed it (a design flaw in a part) with metal, not plastic or aluminum.

At least the Grasshopper is a step up. To me, my profession dictates that I get the best equipment possible.
I can have my Avila II up and ready to go in 30 sec. I can have it closed up and in the bag in 30 seconds. I've been using it so long that when someone comes for a massage it just takes a moment to size them up and adjust the sternum pad. They sit in the chair and I adjust the headrest up or down according to their size. I have found that for most people, setting the whole upper section of the chair on a 2 is usually right...for the average person....bigger people maybe a 3....smaller a little less than 2 The angle of the headrest I set to what is comfortable for me and I very rarely have to adjust it much after that. I see so many therapists just set up their chairs and wait for their first client. Do you sit in your chair before your first client? You should. Unless you are much different than the average person, the setting that works for you should be fine. Clients aren't going to know if you're off by a little...as long as they are in a comfortable position, you're fine.

Not using your chair is not going to ever get you comfortable using it. This chair is awesome in that you can sit so many different body types.

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