massage and bodywork professionals

a community of practitioners

I completed my massage training in Australia in 1999. The course was a full time, 2 year Diploma of Health Science - Massage. In Western Australia, where I am from, this was pretty much the only recognized qualification in the state, and most of the general public that I spoke to knew very little about the effectiveness of massage and likened it to something that beauty therapists did, or simply as pure indulgence. There was also a lot of misconceptions with new age healers and massage. However, my teachers were very respected massage professionals who have worked very hard to educate the general public and build an image of massage as a respected profession and an effective treatment
.
Over the past ten years as the industry has grown we have seen a greater awareness of massage therapy and this has prompted changes in laws and quality assurance packages have been developed to ensure that any who calls themselves a Massage Therapist has met the specific training requirements. the Continuing Professional Education (CPE's) has been a fantastic initiative. Being in WA, we dont get as many courses and workshops as the eastern states, so, you save and plan, and have a little working holiday.

We have some great professional associations, Massage Australia, Association of Remedial Masseurs and Australian Association of Massage Therapists, and there are many many more schools and colleges providing a wide range of massage and bodywork training.

My massage career so far has seen me working in workplace massage for Corporate Touch, sports massage for the Subiaco Sports Massage Clinic (who's MT's have provided massage for basketball, football, tennis and major athletic events), remedial massage for Massageworks and community based care for parents and pregnant wpmen at Mother Nurture. For the past 6 years since having children I have worked for myself as a mobile therapist in a variety of settings.

One of the main differences between the US and Australia that I have noticed, is that as well as having your qualification, you then have to become licensed. I would like to see this happening in Aus, as there are still too many people who complete a weekend or 8 week course and call themselves a Massage Therapist and start up business. This is detrimental to our industry as it undermines those of us who have worked hard for our qualification. This also brings down the value of our service.

On a whole I am feeling very excited about the future direction of Massage Therapy in Australia and the growth of the industry.

So, come on all you Aussie Massage Therapists out there, share your thoughts.

Views: 48

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hi Nicola,

Thank you so much for doing this. I think therapists around the world are inquisitive about massage in other places. I hope therapists everywhere will take your lead and share their "massage world" as well. Thanks again!
HI Nicola, am with you re the differences and training. I have made it my business to go seek and study other modalities (yes, save, book and have a working holiday). I am in practice now in SA, but am looking at returning to WA back to the beloved Albany....the quality of training is far more readily available in the states, as are the modalities, however, its time we made it bigger in Oz also...beyond certification, licensing is good..agreed!...am sick at the sight of those impromptu massage places claiming to do remedial work, yet their poor English (of Asian origin) cannot even disclose contraindications!!! gasp....will I see you in Seattle? world massage conference?? Cheers
Thanks for your comments Liza and Nicole,

I appreciate hearing about MT in other countries and settings. Glad to see you here.
Hi There Liza I have not seen many Aussies on this site. Only you and Nicola, I am thinking about moving to Adelaide (need to get away from a bad breakup) or WA. Is there not much work in SA, would it be better to move to Perth? Love to share your thoughts. Rhia

Liza Derkatch said:
HI Nicola, am with you re the differences and training. I have made it my business to go seek and study other modalities (yes, save, book and have a working holiday). I am in practice now in SA, but am looking at returning to WA back to the beloved Albany....the quality of training is far more readily available in the states, as are the modalities, however, its time we made it bigger in Oz also...beyond certification, licensing is good..agreed!...am sick at the sight of those impromptu massage places claiming to do remedial work, yet their poor English (of Asian origin) cannot even disclose contraindications!!! gasp....will I see you in Seattle? world massage conference?? Cheers
Hi Rhiannon,

Great to connect with you.

I dont know much about the industry in SA, but I do know that there are many successful Massage Clinics throughout the Perth Metro area. I live in the South West of WA, and whilst there are a few good practitioners in my area, there are also many spa massage places as it is a tourist town. For me, I have found that it is really important to know my market and offer a point of difference to the rest. I believe that there are enough clients for all massage practitioners - you just have to find out how to reach them,and how they can reach you.

Best wishes
Thanks for the feedback Zareena. You will be pleased to know that I have secured a room to work from one day a week at a holistic health centre in my town and have started writing 2 blogs, 'Touch Points' at nhmassagetherapy.blogspot and Our Park Life at ourparklife.blogspot. I have also lined up with my local child health nurse the opportunity to give a talk to new mums and parents of young children the importance of self care in nurturing.

Zareena Balosa said:
Its been a very good news that you have completed your degree. I am hoping that you 'll launch your massage center very soon. You should spread your knowledge so that people learn through your massage experiences in Australia. I am waiting for the launching of your massage center.

Massage Therapist Insurance
Hi Nicola.....I've been in the US a couple of years now. I think the aussie system of minmum 2 years full time (TAFE NSW) is a much better grounding for a therapist than here, where you can practice with very little knowledge. If you think Oz has problems you should see Arizona !
I have never been so frustrated in my life. It takes forever to even get accepted to sit the NCBTMB exam. This seems to be the recognised national standard, a standard I consider to be incredibly low. Imagine this if you will............all multiple choice questions...whoa!!!
Thanks Allen, for the insight. I think the perception is that the US has it together with their liscencing etc, but I am aware of the many variations in training and the many political debates with accreditation. I am grateful for my solid grounding of 2 years FT study at Tafe, and for the National Accreditation process here.

Allan J Jones said:
Hi Nicola.....I've been in the US a couple of years now. I think the aussie system of minmum 2 years full time (TAFE NSW) is a much better grounding for a therapist than here, where you can practice with very little knowledge. If you think Oz has problems you should see Arizona !
I have never been so frustrated in my life. It takes forever to even get accepted to sit the NCBTMB exam. This seems to be the recognised national standard, a standard I consider to be incredibly low. Imagine this if you will............all multiple choice questions...whoa!!!

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2014   Created by Lara Evans Bracciante.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service