massage and bodywork professionals

a community of practitioners

A very shady "spa" opened up recently in my small town. Just the atmosphere projected on the outside makes you wonder what really goes on inside. Not that I've had the gumption yet to wander in... However, it has not kept my busy brain and typing skills idle. The internet can give you all kinds of knowledge. Some of which you'd rather not be privy to. This being said, if you have any questionable places in your town and you can't really find any information, I have come across a website that may keep you in the loop. (eroticmp.com) Just because the owners of these establishments can keep their mouths closed, doesn't ensure that their seedy clientele can do so. I have discovered that there are almost 150 (known) in my state. A licensed state. Question is: why aren't the authorities doing anything? And what are you going to do about the ones near you?

Views: 2471

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

That's funny :)

 
Gordon J. Wallis said:

I'm thinking about opening a fake brothel, that only does therapeutic massage work.  
 

So, here's a possibility... even in Mississippi....  "Sweeps month" happens in February, May and November. TV ratings acquired then determine how much local TV stations and National networks determine their ad rates for the next several months.  They LOVE investigative reporting, there are Emmys for it.  So, perhaps it would be possible to have a chat with the "on your side" or consumer protection person at your local station and see if they'd be interested in a story about police & state regulators turning a blind eye to prostitution. You need to contact them now for a February story.  It could be particularly juicy if they find out a local official or the police chief is on the take.  I'm not saying this would be easy, but getting the story on the news might prod the officials into actually doing their jobs.

Just a thought....

ROFL!!!         

 Gordon J. Wallis said:

I'm thinking about opening a fake brothel, that only does therapeutic massage work,

 


 

Very good idea.  College has a Criminal Justice program as well.  Its Director is an aggressive hater of crime. Tried to interest her in the school doing an investigation as public service.  But Corporate is afraid of the negative publicity.  I'll try your idea, see what happens.


Kay Warren said:

So, here's a possibility... even in Mississippi....  "Sweeps month" happens in February, May and November. TV ratings acquired then determine how much local TV stations and National networks determine their ad rates for the next several months.  They LOVE investigative reporting, there are Emmys for it.  So, perhaps it would be possible to have a chat with the "on your side" or consumer protection person at your local station and see if they'd be interested in a story about police & state regulators turning a blind eye to prostitution. You need to contact them now for a February story.  It could be particularly juicy if they find out a local official or the police chief is on the take.  I'm not saying this would be easy, but getting the story on the news might prod the officials into actually doing their jobs.

Just a thought....

I have my own opinions why they do this. When the police raid a business, they seize all the money at the establishment as part of there investigation. Good luck getting it back, even if your proved innocent of any wrong doing. While the police don't actually use the money to line there own pockets, they can claim it as seized assets and use it to buy new police equipment or to justify overtime. This is why when you see these highly publicized busts on an Asian Massage Parlor (AMP)  there are several different agencies involved. It's not an issue of police safety, when's the last time you read that an AMP had a shoot out with police during a raid? Or any weapons seized, EVER. The reason is each agency wants a cut of the seized money assets, period. While I can certainly agree that something probably illegal is happening at these places, I really don't feel comfortable with the police seizing all the money and not returning it. The potential for abuse is too great to ignore something like this.

   

Daniel Cohen said:

... (6 officers) have actually come in and guns drawn told the client on the table to get dressed because it would be a while to complete the investigation. The MT with limited English tried to talk to them and was literally slammed against the wall and a gun muzzle pushed against her nose. This is LAPD. ...

Unfortunately something like this is Very difficult to prove. While they are charged, very few people are actually convicted unless the police run an undercover investigation to prove it. This is why a week after a place is raided, it's open for business again. The main motivation police raid these places is either A. To seize money for the Police departments use or B. To use it as an election ploy by politicians to claim they are tough on crime. 

Tonya Brooks-Taylor said:

... The owner was booked on prostitution charges (operating a 'massage' business and offering sexual services) a few years back in the next town over from me. His/Her state license was revoked I guess...



here is MS, there hasn't been a raid of these things in 20 years, and in this small community, there's 4 of them
Mike G said:

I have my own opinions why they do this. When the police raid a business, they seize all the money at the establishment as part of there investigation. Good luck getting it back, even if your proved innocent of any wrong doing. While the police don't actually use the money to line there own pockets, they can claim it as seized assets and use it to buy new police equipment or to justify overtime. This is why when you see these highly publicized busts on an Asian Massage Parlor (AMP)  there are several different agencies involved. It's not an issue of police safety, when's the last time you read that an AMP had a shoot out with police during a raid? Or any weapons seized, EVER. The reason is each agency wants a cut of the seized money assets, period. While I can certainly agree that something probably illegal is happening at these places, I really don't feel comfortable with the police seizing all the money and not returning it. The potential for abuse is too great to ignore something like this.

   

Daniel Cohen said:

... (6 officers) have actually come in and guns drawn told the client on the table to get dressed because it would be a while to complete the investigation. The MT with limited English tried to talk to them and was literally slammed against the wall and a gun muzzle pushed against her nose. This is LAPD. ...

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2014   Created by Lara Evans Bracciante.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service