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Is it more effective to do massage for people with Parkinson's Disease during the "on times" or "off times"?  I would love to hear others' experiences.

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BOTH! I have a couple of people who suffer from a vast variety of Parkinson's symptoms. Doing regularly scheduled on-going treatments really seems to work the best. Of course, everyone is different and you may have to experiment with your willing clients. Even on the "off times" the end result is usually the same. Peace, relaxation, contentment, increased mobility, decreased "twitches" or "twitchi-ness", etc. Tell the client that you want to see what works best with them. If they come in on an "off" day and they are absolutely miserable on the table, ask if they would like to stop the session or take a quick break and resume. Having the option is a mental "trick" that allows them the feeling of complete control of their treatment. Good luck to you!
Thank you for replying so quickly. I am thinking of writing an article. Would you mind if I quote you (of course, I would give you full credit)--and perhaps I could ask you some more questions as they come up?

Marissa Macias said:
BOTH! I have a couple of people who suffer from a vast variety of Parkinson's symptoms. Doing regularly scheduled on-going treatments really seems to work the best. Of course, everyone is different and you may have to experiment with your willing clients. Even on the "off times" the end result is usually the same. Peace, relaxation, contentment, increased mobility, decreased "twitches" or "twitchi-ness", etc. Tell the client that you want to see what works best with them. If they come in on an "off" day and they are absolutely miserable on the table, ask if they would like to stop the session or take a quick break and resume. Having the option is a mental "trick" that allows them the feeling of complete control of their treatment. Good luck to you!
Hello, I have started working with a new client that has Parkinson's Disease...I believe she is in what is Stage 4 of the disease.  She is 79 years old and weighs only 85 lbs...not able to eat much and her family is now considering tube feeding.  I would like any suggestions on how to design treatments.  So far I have worked 4 - one hour sessions and she tells me that they bring her great comfort and relief from chronic tightness (mainly in her back and neck). She falls on a daily basis and should be using only a wheelchair but she is a feisty and willful gal!....insists on using a walker with wheels. ..I enjoy working with her ..it has been a challenge but a very fulfilling one...can anyone offer advice, suggestions, experience on working with a client with this disease?
This has been very helpful with my new experience in working with a client that has this disease.  Thank you.

Marissa Macias said:
BOTH! I have a couple of people who suffer from a vast variety of Parkinson's symptoms. Doing regularly scheduled on-going treatments really seems to work the best. Of course, everyone is different and you may have to experiment with your willing clients. Even on the "off times" the end result is usually the same. Peace, relaxation, contentment, increased mobility, decreased "twitches" or "twitchi-ness", etc. Tell the client that you want to see what works best with them. If they come in on an "off" day and they are absolutely miserable on the table, ask if they would like to stop the session or take a quick break and resume. Having the option is a mental "trick" that allows them the feeling of complete control of their treatment. Good luck to you!

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