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what are the basic hands on knowledge on Swedish massage?

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Provides an in-depth study of applications of massage on specific muscle groups, integrating musculoskeletal anatomy, pathology, acupressure, and basic Swedish massage techniques.

To know about more have a look at this link : http://www.mindprossage.com/service_posts/swedish-massage/

Swedish massage, which is also known as the physiological traditional massage in western countries, requests an in-depth study of massage on specific muscle groups, in particular musculoskeletal anatomy and physiology. If you want to learn the best thing is to attend a professional course. I live in Italy (Genova) and I have been lucky enough at a very serious and professional massage school, with excellent teachers, which I strongly suggest to all my friends. But I guess that you will find a good school too!

Swedish massage procedures vary according to the need. If you are considering this massage as a relaxation method then, this is the best option. You should find a professional therapist for this purpose. Usually, it will take 70-90 minutes but the actual time may vary according to the therapist. If you are allergic to anything or you are suffering from severe pain, then you should inform that to the therapist before getting the massage. Here is an article which includes the details of the basics of Swedish massage and what people can expect from this massage ( http://www.physiomobility.com/blog/swedish-massage/ ). Hope this will help you. 

Off the subject a bit. I remember when I first got licensed ( in Hawaii). I apprenticed with and initially trained as a Shiatsu therapist. When meeting people and trying to build my clientele. When they found out I was a Shiatsu therapist I often heard something along these lines. "I don't like Shiatsu because it hurts too much. I prefer Swedish." But at the time I kept hearing that I was getting regular massages from a 6'2" guy that did Swedish massage. He was steam rolling me, it was good, but there was nothing soft about it! And of course my Shiatsu never hurt . It was a feel good sore. The lesson is. Reguardless of the style...Use the right pressure. Gosh that was 30 years ago. I worked on a thin futon that was on the ground. No oil. And clients were fully clothed.

Below is a copy the Swedish Technique portion (entitled "Unit II - Massage Therapy Technique") of the Texas Massage Therapy curriculum for you to look over. 

If you want to see the entire massage curriculum for the State of Texas, you can find it here.

UNIT II - Massage Therapy Technique

 200 hours taught by a licensed massage therapy instructor and dedicated to the study of massage therapy techniques and theory and the practice of manipulation of soft tissue, with at least 125 hours dedicated to the study of Swedish massage therapy techniques.

Section 1 History

Section 2 Products

Section 3 Client Preparation and Draping

Section 4 Effects and Benefits

Section 5 Contraindications

Section 6 Overview

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MASSAGE THERAPY TECHNIQUE-HISTORY
UNIT II-SECTION 1


1. COMPETENCY:  DESCRIBE THE HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF MASSAGE AS THE OLDEST METHOD FOR RELIEVING PAIN & DISCOMFORT

  a. Instinctive
  b. Recorded history
    i. Greece, Rome, Egypt
    ii. Dark Ages
    iii. Renaissance (France, Sweden)
    iv. Peter Ling (Development of Swedish Massage)
    v. Europe
    vi. America

2. COMPETENCY:  OUTLINE THE RECORDED HISTORY OF MASSAGE FROM ANCIENT TIME TO ITS CURRENT STATUS IN THE WORLD TODAY

3. COMPETENCY: DESCRIBE THE POSITION THAT THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE HAS IN THIS COUNTRY TODAY

MASSAGE THERAPY TECHNIQUE-PRODUCTS
UNIT II-SECTION 2

1. COMPETENCY:  DESCRIBE VARIOUS MASSAGE THERAPY TOOLS & PRODUCTS USED IN THE INDUSTRY TODAY AND THEIR VARIOUS USES & BENEFITS

  a. Tables
  b. Chairs
  c. Massage mediums
    i. Oils
    ii. Lotions
  d. Tools
    i. Manual
    ii. Electrical



MASSAGE THERAPY TECHNIQUE- CLIENT PREPARATION & DRAPING
UNIT II-SECTION 3


1. COMPETENCY: DEMONSTRATE PROPER PREPARATION OF THE MASSAGE TABLE AND THE VARIOUS FORMS OF DRAPING USED DURING A MASSAGE THERAPY SESSION

  a. Instruct client in the proper preparation for receiving a massage in typical settings
  b. Properly drape client, maintaining modesty while accessing the various parts of the body to be worked on during the massage therapy session
  c. Properly assist client with draping while client is turning during the massage therapy session
  d. Modify draping as needed to maintain client comfort and modesty



MASSAGE THERAPY TECHNIQUE- EFFECTS & BENEFITS
UNIT II-SECTION 4

1. COMPETENCY: EXPLAIN THE GENERAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS OF MASSAGE THERAPY

  a. General Effects of Massage

  b. Benefits to each system
    i. muscular
    ii. nervous
    iii. circulatory
    iv. endocrine

2. COMPETENCY: EXPLAIN THE PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MASSAGE THERAPY ON VARIOUS  SYSTEMS OF THE BODY:

  a. Muscular
  b. Nervous
  c. Circulatory
  d. Endocrine

3. COMPETENCY: EXPLAIN HOW MASSAGE THERAPY COULD ASSIST IN RELIEVING THE FOLLOWING 
  a. Tension
  b. Fatigue – mental & physical
  c. Pain in specific areas
    i. Lumbar
    ii. Cervical
    iii. Thoracic
    iv. Shoulder
    v. Upper extremities
    vi. Lower extremities
    vii. Other body areas

  d. Muscle spasms
  e. Strains & sprains
  f. Joint pain in various joints
    i. TMJ
    ii. Shoulder
    iii. Knee
    iv. Hip
    v. Spinal
    vi. Other key synovial joints
  g. Myofascial pain
  h. Digestion
  i. Headache
  j. Eye strain
  k. Metabolic
  l. Blood pressure




MASSAGE THERAPY TECHNIQUE- CONTRAINDICATIONS
UNIT II-SECTION 5

1. COMPETENCY: EXPLAIN THE DEFINITION OF CONTRAINDICATION.

2. COMPETENCY: RECOGNIZE VARIOUS MAJOR CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR MASSAGE

  a. Major, local and general contraindications, including:
    i. Abnormal body temperature
    ii. Acute infectious disease
    iii. Intoxication
    iv. Skin problems
  b. Systemic contraindications
    i. Skeletal
    ii. Muscular
    iii. Nervous
    iv. Circulatory
    v. Lymphatic

3. COMPETENCY: IDENTIFY CONDITIONS WHICH REQUIRE MEDICAL REFERRAL OR PHYSICIAN APPROVAL PRIOR TO THE MASSAGE THERAPY SESSION
  a. Physical
  b. Mental

4. COMPETENCY: IDENTIFY CONDITIONS WHICH REQUIRE SPECIAL CARE OR ATTENTION
  a. Age
  b. Special needs
  c. Disabilities


MASSAGE THERAPY TECHNIQUE- OVERVIEW
UNIT II-SECTION 6

1. COMPETENCY: IDENTIFY VARIOUS MASSAGE MOVEMENTS

  a. Light movements
  b. Heavy movements
  c. Gentle movements
  d. Vigorous movements
  e. Direction of movements

2. COMPETENCY: IDENTIFY THE PARTS OF THE BODY WHERE THE MOVEMENTS ARE USED

  a. Light movements
  b. Heavy movements
  c. Gentle movements
  d. Vigorous movements
  e. Direction of movements

3. COMPETENCY: DEFINE SWEDISH MASSAGE TECHNIQUE

4. COMPETENCY: DESCRIBE THE MAJOR CATEGORIES OF MOVEMENTS

  a. Touch
  b. Effleurage
  c. Petrissage
  d. Friction
  e. Tapotement
  f. Vibration
  g. Swedish gymnastics

5. COMPETENCY:  PERFORM EFFLEURAGE VARIATIONS TO THE BODY FOR VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS

  a. Superficial
  b. Deep
  c. Centripetal
  d. Centrifugal

6. COMPETENCY:  PERFORM PETRISSAGE VARIATIONS TO THE BODY FOR VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS

  a. Kneading
    i. Manual
    ii. Mechanical
    iii. Electrical
  b. Fulling

7. COMPETENCY:  PERFORM FRICTION VARIATIONS TO THE BODY FOR VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS

  a. Circular
    i. Superficial
    ii. Deep
  b. Chucking
  c. Compression
  d. Cross fiber
    i. Superficial
    ii. Deep
  e. Parallel fiber/Stripping
  f. Rolling
  g. Wringing

8. COMPETENCY:  PERFORM TAPOTEMENT/PERCUSSION VARIATIONS TO THE BODY FOR VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS

  a. Beating
  b. Cupping
  c. Hacking
  d. Slapping
  e. Tapping

9. COMPETENCY:  PERFORM VIBRATION VARIATIONS TO THE BODY FOR VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS

  a. Jostling
  b. Trembling
    i. Manual
    ii. Mechanical
  c. Shaking

10. COMPETENCY:  PERFORM JOINT MOVEMENT VARIATIONS TO VARIOUS SYNOVIAL JOINTS OF THE BODY FOR VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS

  a. Passive
  b. Active
  c. Active assistive
  d. Active resistive

11. COMPETENCY:  DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS OF EFFLEURAGE

  a. Superficial
  b. Deep
  c. Centripetal
  d. Centrifugal

12. COMPETENCY:  DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS OF PETRISSAGE

  a. Kneading
    i. Manual
    ii. Mechanical
    iii. Electrical
  b. Fulling

13. COMPETENCY:  DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS OF FRICTION

  a. Circular
    i. Superficial
    ii. Deep
  b. Chucking
  c. Compression
  d. Cross fiber
    i. Superficial
    ii. Deep
 e. Parallel fiber
  f. Rolling
  g. Wringing

14. COMPETENCY:  DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS OF TAPOTEMENT

  a. Beating
  b. Cupping
  c. Hacking
  d. Slapping
  e. Tapping

15. COMPETENCY:  DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS OF VIBRATION

  a. Jostling
  b. Trembling
    i. Manual
    ii. Mechanical
  c. Shaking

16. COMPETENCY:  DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND BENEFITS OF JOINT MOVEMENTS

  a. Passive
  b. Active
  c. Active assistive
  d. Active resistive

17. COMPETENCY: DEMONSTRATE A MASTERY OF THE ART OF MASSAGE THERAPY BY UTILIZING THE APPROPRIATE ELEMENTS OF MASSAGE THERAPY IN A MASSAGE THERAPY SESSION

  a. Goal of massage therapy session
  b. Client needs, preferences, and expectations
  c. Rhythm
  d. Pressure
  e. Pace
  f. Duration
  g. Technique selection
  h. Client feedback

18. COMPETENCY: PROVIDE MASSAGE THERAPY TO VARIOUS AREAS OF THE BODY

  a. Trunk
  b. Head
  c. Neck
  d. Face
  e. Upper extremities
  f. Hands
  g. Hips
  h. Lower extremities
  i. Feet.

19. COMPETENCY:  PROVIDE A ONE HOUR FULL BODY RELAXATION MASSAGE

20. COMPETENCY:  PROVIDE A 15 MINUTE CHAIR MASSAGE

21. COMPETENCY:  PROVIDE A MASSAGE THERAPY SESSION TO ADDRESS INDIVIDUAL CLIENT NEEDS IN THE MASSAGE THERAPY SESSION

  a. Preferences
  b. Outcome
  c. Expectation

Swedish Massage is one of the most basic techniques that are taught to professional massage therapists. It is the most common technique used at most of the relaxation spas. The focus of Swedish massage is general relaxation, stimulation of circulation, enhancing muscle tone and is also therapeutic in reducing muscle tightness. A good Swedish massage therapist will know how to apply the basic techniques to most any condition, injury or situation.

The basic techniques of Swedish massage are:

Effleurage – a long flowing, relaxing stroke used to assess the skin and muscles, spread lotion/oil, connect with client. Efflleurer – to flow or glide: French
Pettrissage – usually follows effleruage; rhytmic lifting and squeezing of the muscle. Petrir – to mash or to knead: French
Friction – usually follows Pettrissage; rubbing of two surfaces : frictio – to rub. Latin
Tapotement – a repetitive striking of the hands. Taper – light blow: French Taeppa – to tap, Angol Saxon
Vibration/Nerve strokes – Rapid shaking, rocking. Shaker- Latin
Swedish gymnastics – active, passive and resisted movements

 Swedish Massage is one of the most basic techniques that are taught to professional massage therapists, it is famous in USA

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