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I’m buying supplies for my spa, and trying to find a good supplier. Mostly sheets and towels, maybe some hot stones. Stuff like that.

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Hi Albert,

It sounds like your moving forward.  Congratulations!  :)

1) I get all of my sheets at Walmart, believe it or not.  Their off white and white Mainstays twin sheet (purchased as singles as "fitted's" and "flats")  wash and bleach well and last for years.  They are crisp and comfortable.  They come in a little cotton bag like this:

Image result for walmart sheets


2)  I also purchase my blankets at Walmart and choose the lighter weight Mainstays style.  They are soft, at a mid-weight and have lasted for over 10 years, still looking fresh and new.  They are packaged like this (Better Homes & Gardens version):

Better Homes and Gardens Fluffy Twin Blanket, Grey

3) I get the "Crease-Free" face cradle covers from Sew & Sew Online: http://www.sewandsewonline.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=browse&id=2...

4) I purchase my Jojoba Oil from Natural Formulations http://natural-formulations.com/Products/P&NOils/oilse-p.htm :

" I spent a lot of time researching Jojoba oils, because I have to deal with migraine headache issues and eventually settled on my favorite Natural Formulations Golden Jojoba.  I've been using it since 2011. I also put a lot of effort into this thread, Jojoba Oil Revisited , which covers the questions about the smoky smell of some Jojoba's and some potentially useful information on the types of jojoba:  Pure non-deodorized, Pure, Deodorized, and Filtered.  There are also laundering instructions (although I just wash my sheets with liquid All Free & Clear for my detergent.  My machine is this Fisher & Paykel.

I did the calculations with a gallon of the Natural Formulations oil over a period of about 3 years (I go through approximately 1 gallon per year / give or take)  and came to this conclusion:  --> 'It is reasonable to expect to get about 750 hour-sessions from a gallon. Some people more, and some people possibly less, depending on how much lubricant you use.' "


5)  If you haven't purchased tables yet, I can highly recommend Scott Gioacchini who sells Custom Craftworks massage tables in the Houston area (since that is where you are at, and I've known Scott for over 20 years) ... he can get you portable or stationary tables depending on your needs (http://www.advancedcalibrations.com/about-us.html).

6) For your hot stones, although I don't keep these in my office, I'd suggest purchasing them from ScripHessco - https://www.scriphessco.com/shop-by-department/massage/stone-massage/.


7) You can use small white hand towels to cover the arm rests.


Any other questions, just ask.  :)

Thank you so much, your a life saver.
what do you use to schedule your clients?

I use the phone.  :)

I do this for a couple of reasons; the most important one is to filter out individuals looking for questionable services.  I also don't want people to waste my time looking for a type of work I don't offer, just because they didn't read my website.  For example:  I don't work with oncology clients, pregnant women (unless they are already a client or have been referred by someone I know), and minors (unless a family member is a client or they have been referred by someone I know... then, I still speak in detail with the parent before taking the minor on as a client).


A couple of other things I thought of:

1) You could use a sheet service for your sheets, if you want a back up --- or don't want to wash so much.

2)  You'll want to consider providing small bottles for your therapists for their lubricant (lotion or oil). 
Like this: https://www.scriphessco.com/products/massage-lotion-bottle-holster-... 
or: https://www.scriphessco.com/products/8-oz-plastic-bottle-and-flip-t...

3) Most good therapists will also use a rolling stool regularly.  They are expensive, so you can ask who wants one while you are getting started in the business... but it will be important to eventually provide them.   They also beneficial for therapist longevity.  https://www.scriphessco.com/search/?keyword=massage%20stool 

4) I use a king size pillow for under the knees of the client, instead of a bolster.  You'll need something.  Soft bolsters are nice, but you'd do good to have a variety, since you'll be running 5 rooms... Soft bolster:   https://www.scriphessco.com/search/?keyword=soft%20bolster --- Full round bolster: https://www.scriphessco.com/search/?keyword=bolster

5)  These stools are great for when the therapist needs a little leverage, or someone in the room before had the table at a height the new therapist can't work at easily, and the client has already been roomed.  You'd use these, as back ups (kept under the table) if you don't have electric lift tables.  They can be purchased at a later time, but will come in handy here and there:  https://www.scriphessco.com/products/galaxy-step-stool-without-hand...

6) A good way to make your tables better:

• A trick of the trade: If you want your table to have another inch or two for the client to feel more cozy (and will give you some soft flexible edges which still hold an arm very nicely), add one to two twin size egg crates to your table and cover them (and the table) with a mattress pad. This will add an inch plus on either side. And, that’s why I take the 30″ for my office table – the egg crate makes it into a soft sided 32″ table – now I can get in close to the client if I need (without having to deal with a hard edge) and the client has enough room so their arms don’t drop off. 


If I think of anything else, I'll let you know.

What about music, just in case they prefer it. What could I use, I was thinking of a regular CD player. Oh and also what do you think are some efficient shifts for 3 massage therapist thought the week.

I freely admit I am the music queen!  ;)  I have done all sorts of research on music over the years, and can help you get the right CD's and links to other music threads that you can read.

Another option is piped in music, via Pandora (which you can pay to get a non-commercial version). 

If you need piped in music you can get an AV person to help you.  I can recommend Brad Cramer  (https://www.linkedin.com/in/brad-cramer-747707/) in Houston.

Something else could be i-pods in each room, with a full list of songs and albums that the therapist can work with. You may get better sound from this, if you have a nice speaker.

I prefer a CD player with bass boost which you can also plug into a nice set of speakers once you start making more money (Christmas time is a good time to get them a Walmart and the like), and a variety of CD's so that I can work with what I feel is best for the individual client for that session, and also for whatever I may be doing. 

For example, I may choose a CD that has four 15 minute intervals, or I may want a CD that has something that builds on itself to garner a deep relaxation (where I don't care about the timing intervals).

I'll get back to you in a day or so with some CD options and my Pandora music stations that will allow you to test different types of relaxation music, for a great to start.  Give me until Tuesday. 

One other thing, you may want to get a small noise cancelling machine for your rooms at some point, just to make the room more "quiet" for the client, by reducing what they hear coming in the door from the rest of the movement in your office space.

I've been told, this one is good (showing not in stock right now, so I gave you the other option for same item below): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06Y69RHH4/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_enco...

and here in white: https://www.amazon.com/AVANTEK-Machine-Non-Looping-Soothing-Maximum...

What about music, just in case they prefer it. What could I use, I was thinking of a regular CD player.


I just now re-read your question and noticed the reference to someone "preferring" music.  I find that 99.9% of my sessions include some type of background music or natural sounds.  So, maybe you can clarify your thoughts around that.

As for music suggestions, I've listed 16 full CD's instead of individual songs (with a quick-link in each title), because you need something to purchase that will work immediately. I've got a number of CD's that I've created with various songs, but that is to taste, and very specific. 

I've ditched a *lot* of music over the years, so I can vouch that these have been used over and over without driving me nuts.  You can always locate individual songs and create a playlist from those in the future.  My sample Pandora Stations (which I'll put in the following post, since this one is going to be quite long) can help with that.

I hope this helps.  :)


Deep Relaxation Music

1) "Garden of Serenity" by David and Steve Gordon 

Beautiful water and light chime background with soothing music. A favorite, never get tired of working to it, and it completely relaxes the client. I use this on all of my "first-timers".


2) "Rain Dance" by Rob Whitesides-Woo

One of my "go-to" CD's. The music has been described as neo-classical with new age and world music instrumentation.  Something that really makes this CD good for massage is that a few of the tracks having a nice relaxing thunderstorm in the background.  It's very easy for the therapist to hold onto a rhythm or melody on any of the tracks and follow it through the session. I use this CD for both swedish & deep tissue work.

The music consists of guitar, indian flute and world drums. Of course, those don't sound so appealing when you read it out loud, but I promise you, it is a wonderful combination.

The Original playlist (Program time ~ 54:18 mins):

1. The Harvest (14:00) Listen
2. Rain Dance (8:29
3. The Grenadier & The Lady I (9:57
4. The Leaf (11:13
5. The Grenadier & The Lady II (10:39)

My extended version playlist (the individual song times are a little longer due to the gaps between songs, which creates a CD with a run time right around 63 mins.):

1.The Harvest 14:00)
2.Rain Dance 8:29)
3.The Grenadier & The Lady I 9:57)
4.The Leaf (11:13)
5.Rain Dance 8:29)
6.The Grenadier & The Lady II 10:39)


3) "
Natural Stress Relief" by Various Artists

This CD is a good option for both male and female therapists as well as male and female clients. It is soothing without sounding "goo-ey" and can be used with most anyone.

I have been able to use this CD with clients who felt down, sad or were in high stress mode without it dragging them into a more melancholy state.

Having the CD parsed into 4 individual 15 minute segments (Program time ~ 59.56), provides a nice change to short and long music tracks and they all flow together so a 1, 1½ or 2 hour session does not feel chopped up. This also provides a benefit for a new therapist who is still learning how to create a flowing session, by giving them anchor points for their timing.

Additionally, it is important to mention that the music on this CD is composed of multiple and various layers which allow for the therapist to move at an extremely slow pace or quicker one, depending on the type of work he/she provides. The bottom tones repeat enough, in variants of the next, in a way that the therapist could also pick a single pace and keep with it for the entirety of the album if that was the preference.

I am particularly happy with the repetitive nature of the undertones, which provide the client with a place to drift or ground themselves as they so choose.

Track 1 – begins with slow piano dubbed over ocean waves; transitions into tinkling bells and ambient music; transitions back to piano again. (Background: ocean waves)
Note: Normally, I find it very distracting to work with piano music, as it is usually too high-pitched and stylized for my tastes. This particular track has a very slow and recurrent melody combined with a deeper pitch which makes it easy on my ears.
.
Track 2 – light xylophone-type music dubbed over a trickling brook; transitions into ambient music; transitions to bring the xylophone-type music back into the forefront again. This track has a lite-African feel. (Background: trickling brook)
.
Track 3 – three movements of ambient keyboard music dubbed over a gentle rain. (Background: gentle rain)
.
Track 4 – gentle keyboards dubbed over some distant frogs and early morning bird sounds in what feels like a peaceful meadow with dawn breaking. The three movements of this track flow easily and are just bright enough that they help the client slowly come back to reality. (Background: quiet morning birds in a meadow)

4) "Adagio: Music for Healing" by Peter Davison    
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Of all of the Adagio CD's by Peter Davison, I feel like this is the best one for a massage therapist. I have tried the others, and in the end, there is always some song or part of a song that I don't like.

This CD is a full 60 mins. run time, and it does *not* need to be re-mixed. It is beautiful, does not wear me out if I leave it running in the therapy room between clients, and because the last song is 30 minutes, I like to use it for clients who need 30 minutes of work in one area. For example: if I have a client who needs a full 30 mins. of neck work or 30 mins. of foot work, or 30 mins. of back work at the end of a session, this is my go-to CD to keep me on track. :)


5) "Alina" by Arvo Pärt

I really like this CD and wrote a review for it somewhere, but cannot locate it right now.  

It has very quiet and very still works which repeat each other, each time slightly different than the one before. The repetitive though different pieces allow for the client to drop into a clam place, but aren't so quiet that the therapist looses focus.  The piano is not aggravating or too high pitched, which I believe is important. Piano can really turn people off, so you have to be careful when playing it in session.  You can sample it on youTube here.

6) "In Tune: Musical Massage" by David Darling

Beautiful CD.  Cello music... very relaxing and a regular go-to for my clients who need to drift off to somewhere else.

7) "Inside: Musical Massage" by Silvia Nakkach

This CD has vocal background but it is not understandable as individual words and is great for helping a client to completely zonk out.  You can sample it on Amazon to hear the vocals.  :)




Relaxing Tranquility Music

8) "First Snow"

I have one client who only wants this CD each time she comes in.  It is light and relaxing.  It is quite an older CD and a little difficult to locate, so if you can get a copy, I do recommend you grab it when you can.

9) "Synergy" by Joseph Nagler and Atlantic Arts Ensembl

The music on this CD is beautiful and creates the sense of a relaxing exotic café. It is perfect for massage and bodywork due to the of the musicality, multiple layering, flow and reflective 15 minute divisions. It is very versatile.

For example, as a licensed massage therapist, I regularly use this CD when I need to provide deep tissue spot work, so
that I can provide 15-30 minute segments without having to keep an eye on the clock. The music is also easy for the client to drop into. But, if they do prefer to talk, the beat is steady enough that it becomes background music and doesn't distract from the conversation. I also choose this CD when I want to drowning out noise outside of the office. Last, it can be used for a 1, 1½ or 2 hour massage by allowing the client to slowing dip into a very meditative session.

Track List
1. Sapphire (15:01) - Light jazz with relaxing piano, guitar and strings.
2. Turquoise (15:22) - Melodic with guitar and saxophone.
3. Lapis (15:06) - Mediterranean feel with violin and gentle percussion.
4. Aquamarine (16:19) - Keyboards, violin, soft guitar and saxophone.


10) "Language of Touch" by L'Esprit (Amazon has it spelled incorrectly as L'Espirit)

This CD is light, yet extremely relaxing. The melodies are easy for the therapist to incorporate into the session, and I have not found them to conflict with the session flow (be it swedish or deep tissue work).

Although there are electric guitar movements, they are soothing and intermingled with strings and keyboards.

Clients usually talk about the music as providing the feeling of "drifting" or "floating".

Because I use actual CD's in my work-space, I re-created the CD with a Roxio program to add duplicates of a few of the songs, in order to extend the run time to about 60 mins.

The Original playlist:

1. Kira (7:46)
2. Sea of Change (7:00)
3. Ripples (5:24)
4. Shoji (4:28)
5. Taïga (7:45)
6. Breathe (4:28)
7. Language of Touch (4:48)
8. Verandah (7:53)

My extended version playlist (the individual song times are a little longer due to the gaps between songs, which creates a CD with a run time right around 60 mins.):

1.Kira (7:55)
2.Sea of Change (7:03)
3.Ripples (5:26)
4.Shoji (4:45)
5.Taïga (7:49)
6.Breathe (4:35)
7.Shoji (4:45) - duplicate song
8.Ripples (5:26) - duplicate song
9.Language of Touch (4:52)
10.Verandah (7:39)

11) "Europa" by Chris Spheeris

I was given this CD by another Massage Therapist many years ago. It was a lovely gift. I enjoy the way the music flows and use it when I want to bring a little something a little more musical to the session, but still allow the client to fully relax. It is also good background music for clients who like to talk during their sessions.

There is a little bit of percussion that allows the client to float to a distant place. Listen to the samples on a low volume with a bass boost or surround sound if possible, and I hope you will understand better what I am trying to describe. I am not exactly positive of the other instruments on the CD, but I would suggest that they are guitar and keyboard.

12)  "Harmony: Elements Of Balance"  by Sugo Music

I really do enjoy this CD and it is listed in the "Refreshing Tranquility" section of my music. I don't use it very frequently in my massage practice, but it is the perfect CD for a session when someone needs just a little lift. It is easy to work to, the client can relax or talk with it playing in the background, and it has a nice ebb and flow. The percussion influences are a good element for male therapists, who don't want their office to feel *too* spa-ish, but still want to provide the client with a feeling of contentment.

Because this CD has a total run time of 54:06 minutes, I re-mixed it to add in a second play of the track "Butterfly Dance" at the end of the playlist. This addition gives the CD a total run time of a little over 60 minutes, which works better for an hour session.

Southwestern / Native American Music

13) "Desert Dreams" by Arnold Mitchem

I actually purchased this in Big Bend National Park many years ago and re-mixed it to duplicate one or two songs in order to provide a total length of 60 minutes. I did not find the need to cut out any song. They are all excellent.

As a massage therapist, what I love most about this CD are the way the sounds of the desert are incorporated into it. Never overbearing, and very peaceful. I can work to this CD for hours on end and never get bored.

The majority of the music is guitar, so you don't have too heavy of the native american feel. I tend to describe it as more of an ambient southwestern feel. It is also very good music for sleeping.

I am also adding Arnold Mitchem's website, in case these CD's are no longer available on Amazon, and someone happens on this post in the future. ( esongs. com )


14) "Liquid Silk" by Marina Raye

This is one of my favorite Native American flute CD's I have heard over the years. It is not as heavy as many of the male flutists CD's and I like the way the water and birds are incorporated into it. Since I keep my massage CD's sectioned off by style, I have this one in the "Refreshing Tranquility" section.

I must say, this is not something I would listen to every day or even all day, but, I can easily listen to it for three hours of back-to-back clients. And, that is an important concept in my office. For a CD to stay with me, I generally want to have the ability to work with it more than once. Since I do need to be in the right mood to work with flute, this CD will end up in my musical rotation for a half-day, about once every three months, unless I feel like I want to use it for a specific client session. Now, that may not be as frequent a tour as some of my other CD's. But, as we all know, there are times for different music, and if I didn't have the CD, I would certainly miss it.

I find that this CD can be the catalyst for an extremely relaxing session, when using slower and more methodical work in conjunction with the background instrumentation.

An important note: for this particular CD, I find that it sounds better when it is experienced on a very *low* volume setting.

For something that may be played more frequently or even all day, I would consider looking at Adagio- Music for Healing Adagio: Music For Healing. It is not Native American (in fact, I would describe it as more of an Asian feel), but will give you another option if you are looking to add to your relaxation music base.

I probably listen to this CD once every 3-4 months in my practice. Not often, but when I want Native American flute, it has ended up being my go-to CD.




Asian Style Relaxation Music

15)  "Sleeping: Music for Efficient Sleep" by Shanghai Chinese Traditional Orchestra

I am a bodyworker and got this CD from my acupuncturist. She was very kind to give it to me and it has been a "keeper".

As someone else mentioned, there is a gong at the beginning of the CD, but I think it "works" with the music and tunes your body into the CD and the music to come. It is about 45 minutes long and, although I have never felt the need to re-mix this CD into a 60 minute run time, I do work with it judiciously. I use it more for clients coming in for a 1½ hour session than a 1 hour session. In this case I am checking in with the client around the 45 minute mark when the gong appears again. Even when I have not checked-in with the client at the 45 minute replay mark, I have never seen the gong disturb someone. One thing for sure, it can really can put a client to sleep. :)

The music can be full in feel, but in a graceful way. I highly recommend it, if you are looking for something with an Asian feel for your relaxation music library.

======

Another CD that is nice, is "Golden Bowls" by Karma Moffett.  It's quite relaxing and would be good for a spa.  I don't have it in a specific place in my list, because I don't use it frequently.  I mainly use it for my reflexology sessions instead of my massage sessions, because I prefer more movement in my massage music.



I'll add the Pandora links tomorrow. 

There are some typo's in the above thread, and I didn't get a chance to correct them before the forum edit option timed out (for example:  "clam" should be "calm").  :) 



A word about how I use Pandora:

I love Pandora, but I do not like to use Pandora stations for providing actual bodywork anyway, since you never know what kind of song will be next. Even with all of the years I have been working to tweaking my stations (I've provided links to all of my Pandora massage stations for you, just in case you want to look into those), I still get a wild stray in there that I just don't like. It can affect my concentration and flow when something like that comes on.

What I use Pandora for, is to find songs that I can put together into playlists.   So, I listen to it when I am doing computer things and check "thumbs up" and "thumbs down" accordingly.  I will also "thumbs up" some songs that I may not necessarily use in my own practice, but that may be useful for another therapist who has a different "ear" than I do, with the musical qualities falling into the genre I have created for each station.

 

I think the list below will give you all of the Massage Music Pandora Stations I have created (you may need to be signed in to listen to them --- and of course, you can share them with yourself to keep them, and then tweak as you find fits your own style).  Additionally, you can look at my profile on Pandora and find other stations I have created and a few I am pulling music from to give a bump to some of my original stations. "Bump stations" as I like to call them, will eventually disappear.

 

Enjoy!

 

• Deep Relaxation Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188729186758425984

 

• Classical Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188730303449922944

 

• Water/Ocean Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188730148831100288

 

• Refreshing Tranquility Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188729775168945536

 

• Mystical Journey Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188729401506790784

 

• Piano Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188724891791129984

 

• Asian Influence Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188724702812568960

 

• Native American Influence Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188721086450105728

 

• Spanish Guitar Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/184207900455730560

 

• Christmas Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/201208837007211904

 

• Vocal Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/319977241225985408

 

• Jazz Massage - Light, Smooth &/or Tropical Massage Music (work in progress)

https://www.pandora.com/station/297157577471163776

 

• Blues Based Massage Music (work in progress)

https://www.pandora.com/station/343679147097980288


-=-=-=-=-

And, for an excellent thread on a variety of therapist's massage music preferences, you may want to look into this thread, although the beginning pages never got updated when the forum changed over years ago (that means you'll see a lot of brackets in some of the initial posts on the first page or so). 

Oh and also what do you think are some efficient shifts for 3 massage therapist thought the week?


I am really not sure.  Much of it will depend on the area you and in and the needs of the clients.

Personally, I work Wed. through Sun. from 11am - 8pm, because I prefer to skip the traffic coming into and out of town.   And, because I am more of a night person.  So, over the years I have tailored my schedule to traffic conditions (it takes me 45 mins. to get into town, instead of 1 hour and 15 mins.) and to my clients needs (I work though the lunch hour and generally take my break around 2 or 3pm and snack in the evening or eat a late dinner).

With three therapists, you may want to see if you have someone who can cover mornings 8am - 3 or 4pm and then someone to cover 12-8pm, and then a part-timer with flexibility to cover something between 11-3 and/or 4-10.  Just an idea, but I have no idea how it would work.

I would say that you make sure and let your therapists have 2 days off in a row.  When I have to work 6 days a week, it can be quite difficult after a while, due to the need for a re-boot on my end.

Don't get me wrong... it can be done, and I have done it (and am doing it right now for the past few months, due to the recent flooding and needing to get the office back on track), but your therapists really need to have a "job" they can count on while being able frame their days off.  I am a business owner, so many times I have to do things I don't want or like in order to keep my practice running.  But, employees have to work differently than I do, if you want them to stick around.

In regard to purchasing a hot stone set.  Please make sure your therapists have training in this modality before turning them loose on the public.

This video does not cover the basics.  But, if your therapists are trained, then I would also suggest they consider watching this video in order to beef up their technique.

- Bruce Baltz's "Deep Tissue Healing: The Art of Stone Massage" (80 mins.) -  This video gives an example of a good deeper hot stone massage, while not wasting a lot of time switching out more than a very useful amount of stones. There is no "layout" of stones, but he does put the stones into the client's hand, and "tuck" stones in various areas when they become "warm". He also has a nice technique where he pulls larger stones that stay hotter, at the same time he pulls his other stones from his Amber unit. This means he uses some of the smaller stones first, tucks the and then by the time he is ready for the larger stones, they have cooled to his liking. He also shows a nice technique for cooling down the neck stones if they are too hot, by working them on the upper arm prior to using them on the neck. / He uses the cold stones to cool the body temp back down and keeps those in a bowl of ice water before they are used. 

Wow! I love Pandora and have tons of stations already. But I’m gonna check those out.

Pueppi Texas said:

There are some typo's in the above thread, and I didn't get a chance to correct them before the forum edit option timed out (for example:  "clam" should be "calm").  :) 



A word about how I use Pandora:

I love Pandora, but I do not like to use Pandora stations for providing actual bodywork anyway, since you never know what kind of song will be next. Even with all of the years I have been working to tweaking my stations (I've provided links to all of my Pandora massage stations for you, just in case you want to look into those), I still get a wild stray in there that I just don't like. It can affect my concentration and flow when something like that comes on.

What I use Pandora for, is to find songs that I can put together into playlists.   So, I listen to it when I am doing computer things and check "thumbs up" and "thumbs down" accordingly.  I will also "thumbs up" some songs that I may not necessarily use in my own practice, but that may be useful for another therapist who has a different "ear" than I do, with the musical qualities falling into the genre I have created for each station.

 

I think the list below will give you all of the Massage Music Pandora Stations I have created (you may need to be signed in to listen to them --- and of course, you can share them with yourself to keep them, and then tweak as you find fits your own style).  Additionally, you can look at my profile on Pandora and find other stations I have created and a few I am pulling music from to give a bump to some of my original stations. "Bump stations" as I like to call them, will eventually disappear.

 

Enjoy!

 

• Deep Relaxation Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188729186758425984

 

• Classical Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188730303449922944

 

• Water/Ocean Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188730148831100288

 

• Refreshing Tranquility Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188729775168945536

 

• Mystical Journey Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188729401506790784

 

• Piano Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188724891791129984

 

• Asian Influence Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188724702812568960

 

• Native American Influence Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/188721086450105728

 

• Spanish Guitar Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/184207900455730560

 

• Christmas Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/201208837007211904

 

• Vocal Massage Music

https://www.pandora.com/station/319977241225985408

 

• Jazz Massage - Light, Smooth &/or Tropical Massage Music (work in progress)

https://www.pandora.com/station/297157577471163776

 

• Blues Based Massage Music (work in progress)

https://www.pandora.com/station/343679147097980288


-=-=-=-=-

And, for an excellent thread on a variety of therapist's massage music preferences, you may want to look into this thread, although the beginning pages never got updated when the forum changed over years ago (that means you'll see a lot of brackets in some of the initial posts on the first page or so). 

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