massage and bodywork professionals

a community of practitioners

New Jersey Massage Therapists

Information

New Jersey Massage Therapists

Garden State MT's Connecting and Networking.

Members: 94
Latest Activity: 2 hours ago

Discussion Forum

The Pampered Spirit Mobile Massage & Spa is Hiring in North Jersey 3 Replies

Started by Bridget Turnbach. Last reply by Michael A Graves 2 hours ago.

NJ Massage Licensing Law

Started by Bill Curry Apr 2, 2013.

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of New Jersey Massage Therapists to add comments!

Comment by Tamara L Luffy LMT, CNHP on January 7, 2010 at 9:37am
Thank you for bringing the licensing question John. For what it's worth, I'm not in total agreement on the benefits. I've been on both sides. I had practiced in Pennsylvania for 14 years before moving to Florida. Pennsylvania is (I believe) going through the licensing process now. In Penn a lot of medical offices were receptive, I billed insurance directly, provided services in a hospital facility providing integrative therapies, and received a large percentage of my new patients as referrals from medical offices.
When I moved to Florida I was out of work to study for the national exam (what FL uses as their licensing exam), wait for the state agency to lose my paperwork and have it be resent, and to get all of the proper permits etc. Medical facilities are not as receptive to integrative medicine, I have had repeated difficulties with insurance billing, and there will always be illegal activity by unsavory characters. I find just as many "oriental spas" here as I did in the unlicensed state. Due to the large numbers of students being turned out by massage schools, I have come across therapists that passed the licensing but are not doing our profession any favors. I don't believe that a computer exam can gauge what type of therapist you are once you put your hands on someone.
Licensed or not, the insurance companies will always try to get out of paying. I have had direct conversations with adjusters that state: "we cover massage therapy if it is directly provided by licensed physical therapists or an MD, we do not cover massage therapy provided by Licensed Massage Therapists"
I'm on this group because some time in the near future I will be relocating to NJ and I would like to keep informed of what's going on with the profession up there. I wish you guys luck with the process!!
Comment by Bill Curry on January 7, 2010 at 9:12am
I wanted to applogize for the spelling mistakes in my last comment. I type at aboout 45 words a minute, and the computer has been running a little slow lately, and can not keep up with me. Oh, your welcome.
Comment by Bill Curry on January 6, 2010 at 10:07pm
The board has been meeting and revising the Rules and Regs, listed under the old board of nursing, and Division of consumer affairs. When they are done with this proccess, they will make up an application for Licensure, post it on the internet and then the grandfathering will begin. I would say this will happen within two months (educated guess). Those already certified under the old certifaication bill, will be moved in to the Licensure catagory, and will be sent a License automaitcally. Nothing for you to do. As for how licensing will help, ther are many ways First we will be considered a Therapist Licensed by the state as a Therpist. This has a lot of implications, just ask Florida. A massage practitioner can bill the insurance ompany directly with a prescription in that state. Second, there is the credibility issue, we will have more of it. Third, the masage parlors of the past will be gone. Each place that does massage will have to be registered wiith the Board of Massage, pay a yarly fee, and must comply with certain regulations. As a massage community we will have moved into the 21st century. Every person taking money for massage will need to be Licensed and meet certain quailifications. There will be no more people giving the industry a bad name. Just people who know what they are doing. I am not big on the idea of legistlating the indutry, but it was comming where we wanted it or not. Under the old bill, being certified meant very little in reality, but being licensed, we have many opportunites and with i responsibilites. When it comes to insurance billing as an example, insurance companies only deal with state licensed individuals, because the law works differently with licensed individuals. Dealing with insurance companies is tricky at best. I have had dealings with them before, and now avoid them. There are a few however that will make money in this area.
Comment by Christina Arocho on January 6, 2010 at 11:57am
so any idea as to when paperwork will mailed out to CMT's to complete to recieve their License? I am grandfathered in as per the requirements but am still waiting for what I need to fill out and pay.
Comment by Karen Reifinger on January 3, 2010 at 11:39pm
Links:

Theta Healing: www.angelomattei.com

Lomi Training & Healing Retreat: http://hunamua.com/lomiretreatmarch2010/returntosource.htm
Comment by Karen Reifinger on January 3, 2010 at 11:38pm
Aloha New Jersey Neighbors!

Letting you know about 2 upcoming trainings that may rejuvenate your existing massage practice...

Jan. 15-17...Theta Healing Basic DNA2 Certification with Angelo Mattei...
held in suburban Philly on the Main Line. Easy access from all routes,
Septa Rail 1 block away, good parking.



Mar. 18-28...LomiLomi Training & Healing Retreat, Island of Kauai... Temple Lomi Unveiled (authentic vs new age interpretive styles), Traditional Lomi w/Harry Uhane Jim, Huna Kane w/Sandra Michael, plus other native guests and teachers. 48 CE Hours

more info:
Comment by Tene' on December 16, 2009 at 10:42am
Hi Everyone! I am excited to join a group of fellow NJ therapists. I look forward to receiving lots of information, and giving it where I can.
Comment by marissa lynn bauer on December 4, 2009 at 12:06pm
thanks
Comment by Bill Curry on December 4, 2009 at 8:57am
Hi Marrisa - I assume you are inquiring to the massage licensing bill. You actually need to have a certificate of completion, along with a beakdown of what the course entailed. You can be grandfathered in under the new law, but you still need 200 hours of certification. It breaks down to 150 of practicum, 45 of anatomy & physiology, and 5 of ethics. The certification is to identify your scope of practice. Under the grandfathering you need to prove 5 years of part time, or 2 years of full time practice to be eligible for the grandfathering feature. Otherwise you need the basic criteria outlined under the law (not so basic).
Hope this answers the question.
Bill
Comment by marissa lynn bauer on December 4, 2009 at 8:31am
what i dont understand on the website is do i have to be certified and have 500 hours or can i just have 500 hours?
 

Members (94)

 
 
 

© 2015   Created by Lara Evans Bracciante.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service