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Has anyone seen the lastest article in Massage Magazine, " Medical Massage,How Touch Benefits Cancer patients"?

I am looking to discuss this article as I feel it is missing a great deal of information that is already available.  Not a mention of Gayle MacDonald's book, " Medicine Hands," or of any of the established educational/certification programs presently offered throughout the United States.
Too bad the authors missed a great opportunity to show they did their research.

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Haven't read it bit am interested. Can I find it online or do I need to get the magazine?
I wasn't able to find the article online as of yet, disappointing I would have included it with my question. Since the hard copy was just in the postbox I assume that they are holding off on the online version until later this month. So yes a hard copy is needed. I will keep trying to find the article online then post it. Keep looking too.
Thanks... I'll check it out!
I agree that the article missed the boat on the opportunities available for CE courses available with Gayle MacDonald and Tracy Walton, among many others. But, the authors are from the Cortiva Institute so they are emphasizing their program. While their program is unique, there is much more that can be done to expand the use of massage for people with cancer. To me, one of the mst important steps that needs to be taken is to get the MD's (and insurance co's) on board with the benefit of massage - for general health, and for oncology patients in particular. That has been my main roadblock to building any type of oncology massage business. The MD's were afraid of the liability factor in their offices, as well as concerned about how would it be paid for, which the insurance co's won't cover.

The authors seem to put an emphasis on schools including medical massage within their curriculums. I don't think oncology massage should be taught within the main massage curriculum. There are too many factors to consider for the beginning MT to handle right out of school.

I notice they ask MT's about working within the medical system, and not about oncology massage in particular. Which is the same for the article, even though it is sub-titled "Hands-On Therapy for Onclogy Patients".
Gary Thanks. I am an old school Chicago School of Massage Therapy grad which is now owned by Cortiva. What a disappointment. Those of us with oncology massage training just need to keep raising the bar and educating others.

Gary Lloyd said:
I agree that the article missed the boat on the opportunities available for CE courses available with Gayle MacDonald and Tracy Walton, among many others. But, the authors are from the Cortiva Institute so they are emphasizing their program. While their program is unique, there is much more that can be done to expand the use of massage for people with cancer. To me, one of the mst important steps that needs to be taken is to get the MD's (and insurance co's) on board with the benefit of massage - for general health, and for oncology patients in particular. That has been my main roadblock to building any type of oncology massage business. The MD's were afraid of the liability factor in their offices, as well as concerned about how would it be paid for, which the insurance co's won't cover.

The authors seem to put an emphasis on schools including medical massage within their curriculums. I don't think oncology massage should be taught within the main massage curriculum. There are too many factors to consider for the beginning MT to handle right out of school.

I notice they ask MT's about working within the medical system, and not about oncology massage in particular. Which is the same for the article, even though it is sub-titled "Hands-On Therapy for Onclogy Patients".
Yes, I read the article and felt it was a more of an advertisement than anything. I have been in massage now for 6 years and agree that there are so many other factors to consider as a new LMT that to add medical massage of any sort is a bit too much to absorb right off the bat. I become very interested in oncology massage after both my father in law and brother in law were diganosed with cancers. I bought the book Medicine Hands and lived by that book for 2 years. I also spent 2 years trying to educate and bring MDs on board and ran into the problems of liability, and misunderstandings. It has been 4 years since I began a serious look into oncology massage and still the docs won't give me the time of day. Sad. Clients know and come to me thru referrals by others outside of the medical field, and sadly pay for the massage out of their own strained pockets.

Stacy Barden said:
Gary Thanks. I am an old school Chicago School of Massage Therapy grad which is now owned by Cortiva. What a disappointment. Those of us with oncology massage training just need to keep raising the bar and educating others.

Gary Lloyd said:
I agree that the article missed the boat on the opportunities available for CE courses available with Gayle MacDonald and Tracy Walton, among many others. But, the authors are from the Cortiva Institute so they are emphasizing their program. While their program is unique, there is much more that can be done to expand the use of massage for people with cancer. To me, one of the mst important steps that needs to be taken is to get the MD's (and insurance co's) on board with the benefit of massage - for general health, and for oncology patients in particular. That has been my main roadblock to building any type of oncology massage business. The MD's were afraid of the liability factor in their offices, as well as concerned about how would it be paid for, which the insurance co's won't cover.

The authors seem to put an emphasis on schools including medical massage within their curriculums. I don't think oncology massage should be taught within the main massage curriculum. There are too many factors to consider for the beginning MT to handle right out of school.

I notice they ask MT's about working within the medical system, and not about oncology massage in particular. Which is the same for the article, even though it is sub-titled "Hands-On Therapy for Onclogy Patients".

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