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Right after treatment I tend to do more Shiatsu and less skin to skin.
There is a chance that we get some of the drugs through skin to skin contact but its pretty minimal. This is another good reason to wait a few days after chemo before client can receives a massage.
Your thoughts and experiences?

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I tend to find that the mid-point between chemo treatments is the best time to give a massage with the physicians approval of course. This allows the client to have at least one or two good nights sleep. I also find that the client tends to have a little more energy the day after the massage which helps them to feel a little bit normal.
I suggest you check out the article at S4OM.org on To Glove or Not to Glove. Excellent insight about chemo treatment and the risks for therapist.
Even with a physicians Rx I would access the patient and their condition, i.e., what side effects are they experiencing then go from there. Energy work also can be an option here.
Great question as more than half of all people diagnosed with cancer receive chemotherapy.

With certain types of chemotherapy (Thiotepa, Cyclophosphamide), you need to wear gloves if you client has received the medication within 24 hours of the scheduled session.

These medications can come through the client’s skin and are potentially harmful for you unless gloves are worn to reduce exposure.

Consult with you client’s health care provider if you are unsure about medications used.

There a several complications related to chemotherapy that may require treatment modifications.

These are infections, fever, anemia, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, peripheral neuropathy, mouth sores, and hair loss.

Another consideration is how chemotherapy is administered, which is often using a central venous catheter to eliminate the need for repeated needle sticks.

I hope this helps...
Thank you for the input! very useful information!
I am an oncology nurse and LMT you should never perform massage during chemo , this is very dangerous and not to mention the patient is at a very vulnerable time for many side effects and complications due to the chemo . The safest time is at least a week post chemo . Cancer patients love massage and it is very rewarding to give it .
Thanks so much for your input Beulah, and glad you joined this group!
Eeris
I agree. I have definitely had effects from working on a client who has recently received chemotherapy. The drugs are excreted through the skin, giving a peculiar feel to the action of the lotion on the skin. On occasion I have felt slightly nauseaus after massaging a client who is receiving chemo. The effects are brief, and I have washed my hands immediately and thoroughly after the massage. This is certainly something to be aware of. I appreciate Beulah's advice that we should wait a week before giving treatment. My sense is that it depends on how strong a dosage of chemo is being given. I have felt effects on a couple of clients, and not with others.
Thank you for this comment. I just shared the Study with a good friend of mine that they did with women who have had breast cancer and mastectomies. I have offered to do massage post Tx even before I viewed the article. She is undergoing Chemo now.
Thank you Susan . . .for this info. Sometimes we get so caught up in doing for people or friends, we forget that we still need to protect outselves as caregivers or therapists. It was yet another reality check. I guess truly waiting until at least a week after each Tx is best. The question is: should you still wear gloves to protect yourself, or are you ok at that point in time? Mary Ann

Susan G. Salvo said:
Great question as more than half of all people diagnosed with cancer receive chemotherapy.

With certain types of chemotherapy (Thiotepa, Cyclophosphamide), you need to wear gloves if you client has received the medication within 24 hours of the scheduled session.

These medications can come through the client’s skin and are potentially harmful for you unless gloves are worn to reduce exposure.

Consult with you client’s health care provider if you are unsure about medications used.

There a several complications related to chemotherapy that may require treatment modifications.

These are infections, fever, anemia, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, peripheral neuropathy, mouth sores, and hair loss.

Another consideration is how chemotherapy is administered, which is often using a central venous catheter to eliminate the need for repeated needle sticks.

I hope this helps...

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