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Nutrition

This is a group where therapists/bodyworkers can share powerful points, tips and research which we can then pass on to our clients.

Website: http://asismassage.com
Location: Clarkdale, AZ
Members: 109
Latest Activity: May 20

Discussion Forum

Coffee Anyone? 5 Replies

Started by Mike Hinkle. Last reply by Jenna Williams Aug 2, 2011.

Power Foods That Protect Your Health 22 Replies

Started by Mike Hinkle. Last reply by Mike Hinkle Jan 27, 2010.

Vitamin C Megadosing 4 Replies

Started by Kelly Lindsay. Last reply by Darcy Neibaur Jan 27, 2010.

Comment Wall

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Comment by Shirley Knapp on March 20, 2014 at 10:02am

Rejuvenate yourself with my NCBTMB CE Home-Study course "HEALING THE HEALER". Self-paced, 3 CE hrs.,$33. and open to everyone! Approved by NC Board of Cosmetic Arts and FL Board of MassageTherapy #50-15726. www.shirleyknapp.com/healingthehealerhomestudycourse.html

Comment by Jenna Williams on July 19, 2011 at 11:06am
Does anyone currently offer nutritional supplements as retail in your office?  If so, share how and what you use.
Comment by Justine Baker on December 31, 2010 at 2:53am

Yea chia seeds are pretty amazing, just found out about them, and now my friends tease me because I try to add them to just about anything.

 

Chia has 6 times more calcium then milk

15 times more magnesium the broccoli

It’s also high in Omega 3


A healthier me for the new year!


Find more info at:

www.chiaseedcentral.com

Comment by Carolyn Forlee on August 7, 2010 at 11:24am
So I have a client that is extremely difficult to work on because his connective tissue and muscles just do not give. I asked him if he drank enough water throughout the day and his response was 'no, but probably more sodas'. I've also seen him at the grocery store before stocking up on microwavable food.
I know that this diet of processed foods and soda is the cause of his unhealthy connective tissue so my question is, how do I tell him or try to talk him into eating healthier.
Comment by Darcy Neibaur on March 23, 2010 at 9:18pm
Does anyone know anything about Chia Seeds?

Get More Energy and L'ose Weight with Chia!!! ( No Blarney!! )




This past year I learned about an amazing Super Food
that I want to tell you about.

I have to admit - when I heard people talk about this,
all I could think of were the Chia Pets that used to
be advertised on TV in cheap commercials, and I had
no interest.

Well upon urging of my Natural Foods teacher,
I decided to try them so I picked up a bag of Organic
Chia Seeds in Whole Foods.

Eh - tasteless, and no big deal I thought. I mixed
them in water.

Well, I must tell you - I noticed a strength and stamina
that was very unusual for me - subtle, but noticeable.

Today, if I go without my Chia - I miss it tremendously.
I've also noticed I'm not as hungry and I don't have
those occasional afternoon blood sugar dips nor cravings
at night!

Now, I do prepare them in a special way - here is how
in this video (1 min 14 sec):




Here are the benefits and ways you can use Chia:


Give you tremendous energy and stamina
Help you lose weight b/c they fill you up and cleanse your intestinal tract
Omega-3 fatty acid and better than flax in that they can be stored for long periods of time without becoming rancid
Chia seeds are 'hydrophilic' so they keep you hydrated longer

Chia seeds were a main component of the Aztec and Mayan diets.
There is a drink popular in Mexico and Central America called “Chia Fresca” where they mix chia seeds in water and add lime or lemon and sugar.

How to use
Sprinkle on your food
Add to smoothie
Allow to become gelatinous in liquid and eat with spoon
As with everything – best to get the organic!
Sources:
http://www.thechiaseed.com
http://www.nutsonline.com
Comment by Mike Hinkle on February 24, 2010 at 10:20am
Comment by Erica Olson on February 13, 2010 at 10:54am
Errr . . . that should be "been told"
Comment by Erica Olson on February 13, 2010 at 10:48am
FWIW, I've been that citrus isn't very good for compost, but I figure it all rots anyway. Never had any problems, but my compost isn't overly balanced towards citrus. You can compost all your junk mail, too! (Everything minus meat--which, technically, you /can/ compost, but it's difficult to do in backyard composting without getting smelly.)
Comment by noreen zakrajsek on February 13, 2010 at 10:10am
Thanks Erica for the great advice. I will look into purchasing a container to start stocking away the plup in my garage until we can build the box this spring.
Comment by Erica Olson on February 11, 2010 at 9:30pm
Noreen--depending on what type of juice you're doing, you can put the pulp in your water bottle and allow it to flavor the water you're drinking.

As for composting, you don't want a solid bottom on an outdoor container; having direct contact with the soil is how you get the beneficial bacteria in to break it all down. The cheapest and easiest way to build a compost bin is to stand four pallets on their sides in a square (obviously, it's best if the pallets are in good shape). You can tie a rope around them or nail them together. Adding another pallet/planking/fencing on top will discourage animals. It won't keep out bears, but waiting until things are pretty well decomposed before chucking them in the bin is easy enough.

I live in the mountains of Colorado, so I can't really do winter composting either--just gets too cold and my compost pile isn't big enough to generate enough heat in subzero temps when the ground is frozen. I do have a shed with bins, but in lieu of that, get some 5-gallon buckets with lids (like the ones laundry detergent comes in). I keep mine in my kitchen with the lid on loosely. When it fills, you can pop it outside and let it freeze til spring, or firmly close the lid and store it in your garage, back closet, etc. If you don't open it, it won't stink.

When it gets warm enough, put together your compost bin, chuck all your saved, partially decomposed scraps in, throw in some straw/wood chips/manure/extra dirt/etc., and call it good. Keep it damp but not wet and turn every couple of months or so to aerate. An excellent source is the book Let it Rot.

Alternatively, check out vermicomposting (composting with worms).
 

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