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Does your state board or professional organization protect you from unlicensed MTs?

Most of us have done what is required to be licensed and even beyond. This may be out of professionalism or just desire for a job. But what is done about our unlicensed competitors? Do you feel your board or organization is working on your behalf to stop unlicensed competition? Do they verify new hires at spas? Do they monitor the ads for illegal misrepresentation? I see hundreds of ads to move out of state for immediate job opportunities. In every state fake photos are used to entice clients. With thousands of unlicensed able to move from state to state for immediate hire, how are we being protected from low pricing and the portability that goes with working without a license?

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Or to put it another way, is a dual system good for the profession?

Here in Alaska, there is no state licensing. In Anchorage, in order to work as a massage therapist you have to show paper work that you have graduated from a massage school with at least sevenhundred and something hours.  All the prostitutes do is show the city a fake license from a fake school in California, pay money(what the city really wants), and they get a license to practice massage in Anchorage. its a joke. So in this case, there is no prootection.  But Im busy so?  lol

Oklahoma also has no state licensing.  My city requires a license; we are only required to have 500 hours, but the city also does a police background check.  I have no idea how many unlicensed therapists are around.  And, of course, if they operate outside the city limits it's totally legit.

Like Gordon, I'm busy so I'm not worried about my particular situation.

Is a dual system good for the profession?  I'd like to think that people (clients) can figure out the difference!  I don't know how much a tighter regulatory system would help.  As long as there is good money in massage, people will find a way to work around the system.

From PA here, and no, the State Board of Licensing here, does not do enough. The law is open for too many "body work" types, and they do not enforce any thing when reported. I have a firend that has reported an unlicensed therapist for two years, and nothing is done, no response. So has licensing helped? No, and the whole system needs revamped or stopped. We pay dues, we follow all the requirements, yet, for what? Every time we turn around, there is another person working without a licesense, or a chiro is hiring one, along with the salons. Public education is key, and it's not like we can reach every one in our area to inform them of the laws. Pricing is not so much an issue to me.

Unfortunately this problem will continue IMO... Tracking down unlicensed people would be too big a chore. It will just have to be nipped in the bud once that person is discovered. 

I hate the way Oklahoma does it! I work at an upscale spa in Edmond, a suburb of OKC. There is no requirement to even be certified in Edmond. I work with a lady who has been "practicing" mt for over 20 years, but has never taken a class. I hate it. The rest of us spent time and money to be educated... There are prostitutes busted monthly in the suburbs of OKC. It gives all of us a bad rep and makes a fool out of the entire profession.

Ha at "I'm busy, so?"

Gordon J. Wallis said:

Here in Alaska, there is no state licensing. In Anchorage, in order to work as a massage therapist you have to show paper work that you have graduated from a massage school with at least sevenhundred and something hours.  All the prostitutes do is show the city a fake license from a fake school in California, pay money(what the city really wants), and they get a license to practice massage in Anchorage. its a joke. So in this case, there is no prootection.  But Im busy so?  lol

I work in VA. We are required to be licensed. I have been in this profession for almost 3 years starting March 1st. When I first started out I wasn't certified nor was I licensed - working in a day spa. I agree. Laws and regulations, in general, should be tightened. Although, the money that I have earned have definitely helped to pay for the test and any other necessities that I needed at the time, seeing as though while I was in school I did not have a job.

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