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I have discovered a set of hands on procedures, that I’m now calling, Holographic Acupressure. These procedures are truly revolutionary in scope and capabilities. Not only can you release almost any muscle you want painlessly and instantly, which is significant when it comes to Myofascial pain syndrome, and trigger points( 85% of all pain ). It’s also significant to seemingly unrelated problems such as Gastroesophageal reflux disease, otherwise known as Acid reflux, or chronic heartburn. It’s often times a problem of the LES muscle, as stated in the link below.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0028105/?report=reader

Read the statistics on GERD as well as my recent testimonial in the attachments below.

I’m starting to think about the best way to get my Holographic Acupressure out to the world. Any suggestions?

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I’m so happy when I help somebody.  It’s a good feeling.

More then enough people that watch my videos, think it’s a scam.  Or at best placebo. Some even become very angery.   But I assure you what I do is based on science.   I think Holographic Acupressure is the most advanced system of manual therapy out there.  But there are other systems based on the nervous system, and I maybe wrong? I’ve partially studied many of them, which helped me further develop my Holographic Acupressure procedures.  Here is one of those systems. 

The nervous system controls everything.  

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvUylP223Tk&sns=em

Holographic Acupressure is highly effective, and very easy.   Even a lay person can do it.  It’s that simple.  Listen to what this young lady says.   Also,  she did not believe it to be true or real.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsgafszYeOA&sns=em

I’m going to be repeating myself here.  I know some good people in here are tired of it.  I’m going to be repeating what I said earlier in this thread, as well as the subject I’ve been writing about on this website for years.  The misdiagnosis of pain and the importance of trigger points when it comes to acute and chronic pain.  Experts say that trigger points are responsible for 85% of all pain and involved in 90% of all pain syndromes.  In my experience I find that estimate to be pretty much right on.  But let’s assume that only 40% of all pain is caused directly from trigger points and that trigger points are involved in only 50% of all pain syndromes.  Considering the fact that the pain industry in this country( USA ) is a $700,000,000,000.00 a year industry.....Massage Therapists are uniquely positioned to a fair portion of that business.  

Remember the headache lady I talked about earlier in this thread. I saw her recently and she is fine.  She suffered a continuous headache at a 6 to an 8/10 pain level for over a year.  She went to Chiropractors, physical therapists, medical doctors, you name it.  

The anesthesiologist I work for was called into the hospital to give this patient an occipital nerve block.  Can you imagine having headaches so bad that you have to be hospitalized?  After examining her, he knew it was myofascial pain, and told her to see me.  She came the next day.  After her first session her headache was gone.  Now it later came back.  I’ve seen her maybe a total of seven times.  Now she is headache free.  It was all trigger points, as usual.  Well mostly usual.   If you haven’t already seen her testimonials just scroll up the thread.  They are there somewhere. 

Now the docs I work with know trigger points, but most providers of all ilk, know nothing of trigger points.  Even massage therapists.  She is not the only person suffering needlessly.  There is , for all practical purposes, more work out there then all of us can handle.   My Holographic Acupressure is perfectly setup to eliminate trigger points nearly effortlessly in seconds.  But even if you just use the old school methods of direct pressure release and so on, you can help a fair percentage of people.  If you go to www.triggerpoints.net you  will get an idea of the real pain that trigger points cause.  

In the attachments below, two of em.  The first are the treatment notes from the second time I saw her.   The second attachment are her treatment notes from a few sessions later and are from her most recent visit.  Notice all the trigger points found in her second session compared to her latest session.  Anyway sorry for being a broken record( if anybody knows what that means anymore).  But there are physical therapy clinics, chiropractic clinics, acupuncture clinics, and medical clinics of all types filled with people hurting from myofascial trigger points.

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This is an interesting case.  This patient came in with pelvic pain and knee pain.  Both on the right side of the body.  She has been suffering from the pelvic pain for, I think she told me a year.   The pain is felt in her lower abdominal area, and into her groin area on the right side.  The knee is a more recent exasperation of an old injury.  I saw her twice with good results.  I will post her treatment notes in the attachments.  You can see the difference in the number of trigger points between her first and second sessions.  On her second session the pelvic pain was gone.  Who knows, she may have some kind of underlying pathology, but that’s pretty dramatic results.  All I did was make some trigger points go away.  The knee felt noticeably better, but was still swollen and hurting in the beginning of her second session.  After the second session it was still swollen, but no longer hurting.  That’s cool.  

Tomorrow I have a challenge.  A new patient that has had on and off neck pain for years.  However recently it got so bad that she had to go to the emergency room.  I was called into her treatment room to see if I could afford her any relief.  Her neck was so locked up, she had very restricted rotation  both left and right.  Within a few minutes, by eliminating some trigger points in her neck and shoulders, she had nearly full range of motion to the right and noticibly better range of motion to the left.   It was enough improvement for her to schedule with me tomorrow.  She will be getting some mri imaging to rule out any mean nasty stuff.   But, I can still work on her because the Holographic Acupressure techniques are so benign.  I will have to do a full body treatment on her.  On palpation her low back was hurting as well.  Low back and neck are definitely connected.  I will have to relieve that low back pain in order to have a better chance at offering lasting relief for her neck pain.  I just hope there is no bad pathology that will limit her recovery.  

Anyway, check the knee/pelvic pain client treatment notes out.  I’m just amazed that some people are still telling me that trigger points are not real?

PS- for those that think I’m full of myself I’m not.  The vast majority of people I worked on today I could not help.  Their pain was beyond myofascial.  Often enough I do find and eliminate trigger points and the patient feels better, only to have the pain and trigger points return within a half hour.  That’s because there is some kind of underlying pathology that needs treatment, and my trigger point work is not the treatment they need.  The trigger points are just symptomatic of something deeper.

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One of the benefits of Holographic Acupressure is that the assessment is the treatment itself.  So there is no need to through an assessment process.  Orthopedic or postural assessments are not needed to determine where the problem is, or to determine if it’s muscular or not.  And you are not going to hurt anybody because the treatments are so benign.

In the video, the therapist is teaching how to determine if the pain problem is muscular or ligament? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnCJETIlU5E&sns=em.  If you know Holographic Acupressure, it’s simple.   If the pain is do to ligament damage, the pain under your finger will not disappear.   Then you refer out to an orthopedic medical doctor.   There is no need to learn complication orthopedic assessment procedures.  

As fare as postural anaylisis in order to try and figure out where the pain is coming from.  Unnecessary as well.  Because in Holographic Acupressure you end up palpating the entire body for pain and tender points and eliminating them quickly as you come across them.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2VFVrkzqq0&sns=em.  Also realize muscles move bones.  Posture will change.  I don’t see why any of that analysis is needed as far as helping the patient out of pain?

And as far as taking the time to learn and discern trigger points through senseing and feeling the tissues, which is way to subjective, way to over complicated and totally unnecessary, the patient tells you when on a trigger point.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6ay9Di10kg&sns=em

Here is how I might choose to eliminate an upper Trapezius trigger point.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCsWLkXDIFI&sns=em    

Holographic Acupressure treatments are fast and effective.  Often times only 20 minuets are needed.  And because there is no digging on damaged tissue. Results( or failure )are much quicker.  

There are other differences between Holographic Acupressure and other forms of myofascial therapy.  For instance.... Stretching and exercise , with few exceptions, is contracted while going through a series of treatments. 

I just re-read my last post.  So many misspelled and missing words.  I guess I should proof read.  Anyway..   In my last sentence, I meant to say.. Stretching and exercise is, with few exceptions, contraindicated for the patient while they are going through a series of Holographic Acupressure sessions. 

Here is an interesting video.  It’s a co-worker that had a knee problem.  These techniques are powerful.  Pain(myofascial)is literally gone in seconds.  This video was done a few weeks ago.  Only this one treatment, she has been pain free ever sense.

 

https://youtu.be/wM6SmQj8cKY

here is her testimonial right after the treatment. 

https://youtu.be/V_NCX8T-_Gc

Today was a good day in the clinic for me.  Everybody I touched, I was able to help in a dramatic way.  A couple notable ones come to mind.  One of the physician assistants called me into one of the treatments rooms to see if I could help this patient.  Last week he had gotten some procedures for his shoulder pain.   Prior to the procedures he could barely lift his arm but a few degrees.  After the procedures he could lift it to about the 90 degrees.  That’s parallel to the ground.  The PA was wondering if there was anything I could do for him?  In less then two minutes, to his astonishment, and mine, he lifted his arm 165 degrees before pain stopped him.  This shoulder condition has been going on for a couple years.  He had trigger points in all the right places.  He was freaked out happy.  

Another patient had knee pain to the point that once she sat down, she needed help in order to get to a standing position.  Her knee pain was at a 5 to 6/10 level.   She was a scheduled patient for me.  Never saw her before.  After fifteen minutes she could stand up without pain from a sitting position.  You should have seen the look on her face.  That was cool.  Here are her treatment notes.  Look at all the trigger points.  The popliteal was the worst one.  The power of these procedures are impressive.  I’m freaked out on a daily basis.  

Sort of a follow up.  The patient above.  The one with the knee pain.  She was doing excellent until she went to physical therapy yesterday.  I don’t know about these physical therapists.  She was a 1/10 prior to the physical therapy, and an 8/10 after.  Really hurting.  She said the exercises hurt her leg.  One of the exercises they had her doing was kicking her heal to her butt.  Her biggest, most nastiest trigger point was that popliteal muscle.  That totally inappropriate exercise gave her such pain.  When I saw her today, that muscle was tender as a boil.   

Ive mentioned this before, in my other threads.  That I don’t even wanna see anyone if they are currently in physical therapy.  I can pretty much count on them undoing any progress I’ve made with a patient.  I will see them after the physical therapy fails. Because if they have trigger points, it will fail.  Unless the physical therapist knows about trigger points and is doing some kind of myofascial work themselves.  This is not an isolated case. It’s normal.  

Anyway, after I saw her today, she was a 1/10.  She had even more trigger points then the first time I saw her.  After the session she looked at me and said.  I’m not going to physical therapy anymore.  I feel good now.  

This is cool.  This patient had numbness in her big toes for over two years, as well as painful range of motion in her neck. People are often freaked out over the effectiveness of Holographic Acupressure.  It truly works like magic.  I may be able to totally eliminate the numbness in her big toes?     I actually did not know about the numbness in her big toes until her second appointment, which is the most recent appointment.  She had very painful tibialis anterior trigger points in each leg.   

Anyway, check her testimonial out, and look at the pain pattern of the tibialis anterior.  

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cjBf1W-kW80

I think I’m going to change the name of my modality.  Holographic Acupressure is kinda hard to say.  And some scientific minded people are turned off by the word Acupressure. I think I will call it The Pain Control Matrix.  But regardless of its name, these procedures are truly revolutionary when it comes to dealing with myofascial pain.  All other forms of trigger point work are obsolete.  In the video below you will see me treat an injured Achilles’ tendon.  How injured?  Well it was enough to keep her from running and walking with a slight limp.  Now how would a conventional trigger point therapist treat an injured Achilles’ tendon ?  How would any bodyworker/manual therapist treat an injured Achilles tendon ?  The treatment that you will see in the video has never been seen before.  It has never been done before.  And what other form of manual therapy would work as quickly?  After the treatment, I re-palpate, and the pain is not there anymore.  Will the pain come back?  Probably.  I will most likely have to repeat that treatment a few more times before it’s fully healed. But it only takes a few minutes.   Anyway, check the video out.  https://youtu.be/9E2TuRXq9ns

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