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I’m sure this will be controversial.  But like everything I write in here, it’s my truth.

 There is too much emphasis on fascia.  And I feel that is one of the reasons that holds our profession back.  I never once think about fascia when I’m working(doing my best to help people out of pain). I do however think about muscle.  Muscle has a much, much, much sronger contractile force then fascia.  There is really no comparison.  Muscles move bones. And can certainly distort posture.  Then when you consider the fact that muscles work in chains and groups that function as one powerful muscle. You are going to be a much more effective therapist if you concentrate on releasing tight painful contracted muscle tissue, instead of of releasing fascia.   My opinion only.  Something to think about? 

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I recommend you watch Gil Hedley's video series (http://gilhedley.com/setinfo.php).

You will see through his dissection work that although muscles have more contractile strength, the muscles and fascial web are entwined to such a degree that it IS Impossible to physically separate them from one another. From the cellular wall-level (and interstitial fluid) up to to epidermal layer-level there is no separation- just differing properties between epi-, meso-, and endo-dermal layers. Some understanding of biodynamic embryological development I have also found helpful in understanding the body (Erich Blechschmidt as translated by Brian Freeman [I found the video series easier than reading the "Ontogenetic Basis of Human Anatomy"]).

Tom Meyers is also a great resource on this fascial topic.

Tensile action exists in both muscle as well as is fascia.

If epidermal fascia were dissected off of a body, you would be able to recognize the person (if you had known them!) or recognize the epidermis as a human. Not so with the musculature.

I have read Tom Meyers book, and watched another therapist do myofascial release on a client.  And I could have accomplished much more in a fraction of the time, just by eliminating trigger points.  And 90% of the patients I’m working on in this pain clinic, could not at all handle a Myofascial release session let alone a Rolfing session.   Fascia is there and everything. But I personally don’t see it as a practical or efficient way to approach most myofascial pain conditions.  

Your initial statement was incomplete only because only in your follow-up did you mention any of your issues and ideas.

Whatever you are doing is helping your patients/clients, which is good for them.There is no one way, to offer healing- except not causing more pain!

There is no way of doing Trigger points, etc. (enter most any modality here) without affecting fascia since yet again, you are affecting fascia when you are doing trigger points. Even Acupuncture needles affect fascia at the Meridian points.

The Tp's fascial collagen and viscoeleastic fibers are stuck together encumbering movements of muscles. 

Still recommend Gil's reverent dissection videos. They gave me a deeper appreciation of the functional form of ALL of the body's tissues that are interconnected----- through fascia.

I will check his videos out.

Kit Lofroos said:

Your initial statement was incomplete only because only in your follow-up did you mention any of your issues and ideas.

Whatever you are doing is helping your patients/clients, which is good for them.There is no one way, to offer healing- except not causing more pain!

There is no way of doing Trigger points, etc. (enter most any modality here) without affecting fascia since yet again, you are affecting fascia when you are doing trigger points. Even Acupuncture needles affect fascia at the Meridian points.

The Tp's fascial collagen and viscoeleastic fibers are stuck together encumbering movements of muscles. 

Still recommend Gil's reverent dissection videos. They gave me a deeper appreciation of the functional form of ALL of the body's tissues that are interconnected----- through fascia.

Fascia is inert and not that relevant when assessing for pain and tightness.

After all, when is the last time a client asked for their fascia to be "loosened" or "stretched"? And how would one be able to positively 'effect' tissue in isolation, without damaging surrounding tissue? You can't. 

There is far too much misinformation floating around the inter-webs about fascia. It's a fad that needs to go away, but it makes the fascia gurus money and increases their popularity, off of people's ignorance, (including their own) about how pain, tension, and the nervous system work.

The links below are from blog-sites, which are based on current scientific evidence, and shows just how far off the mark fascia followers have veered.

https://www.painscience.com/articles/does-fascia-matter.php

http://www.greglehman.ca/blog/2012/10/26/fascia-science-stretching-...

https://www.jennirawlings.com/blog/fascia-myths-and-fascia-facts

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