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Body Cells Carry Emotional Memory

                      By Boris Prilutsky

I found the theory that body cells carry emotional memories to be a true one. During my 38 years of clinical experience, numerous times I have witnessed the emotional reactions of my patients/clients to soft tissue mobilization. To more clearly explain this phenomenon, I would like to share one of my most interesting clinical experiences with you that support the theory of emotional memory being carried body cells.

Over 20 years ago, I treated one of the world-renowned boxers of the time from a shoulder injury. The right shoulder had a severe sprain/strain case with suspicion of possible rotator cuff tear. As with all such cases, after 24 hours of cold application procedures (cold application must be applied no more than 10-15 minutes and must be repeated every two hours) we started intensive massage therapy on the unaffected side in order to awake vasomotor reflex that will express by increasing blood supply to the injured extremities. I began to follow the treatment protocol for the above-mentioned purposes, starting to mobilize all groups of rotator cuff muscles layer by layer, as well as the anterior, posterior, and middle part of the deltoid muscles. As he was receiving the massage therapy, suddenly this big, tough, extremely strong man started crying, vocalizing sounds like that of a little boy. He was confused and expressed his embarrassment at breaking down in tears.

Being familiar with the theory that body cells carry emotional memory, I suggested to him to cry out whatever this emotional memory was. The sport clinical psychologist was informed of the incident. During his evaluation, this professional athlete, with the help of the psychologist, recovered a memory from his deep subconscious of an event that happened to him when he was eight years old.

Briefly, the story was that the boy's grandfather (his mother's father) once interrupted the constant fight between the boy's father and alcoholic mother; his grandfather attacked his father with a hammer. Afterward, the father was delivered in critical condition to the hospital and the grandfather was arrested. During this period of time, the little boy future boxing champion fell, off his bicycle and hurt his left shoulder. Crying, he came to his mom who was screaming into the phone, and asked her to comfort him because of the pain in his shoulder. His mother reacted in anger, and took his pleas as just whining for attention and she hit him with the phone a few times on this painful shoulder. All these years, on a subconscious level, this man carried difficult baggage of these memories of events related to losing the most important people in his life; his grandfather and father; and related to rejection by his mother. This kind of crying, emotional release tremendously helped this athlete to get rid of this subconscious trauma. This heavy emotional baggage was terribly disturbing and robbed him of a lot of happiness all these years, without him even knowing it existed. My experience has taught me that usually these emotional releases happen with people at the time when we perform massage (including deep tissue mobilization) in the inhibitory regime. Please be aware that emotional release may not be expressed by crying. Many clients may report to you that they have trouble sleeping and experience worry, or they may start shaking during the massage. Some of them will report unusual emotional sensitivity. Please explain to your clients that all above-mentioned reactions are very positive reactions and within the next few days of going through these reactions, they will feel a great deal better. Regarding the boxer whose case I presented to you, he later reported to me that he never thought that this subconscious baggage could destroy the quality and happiness of his life so much. He told me that thanks to this innocent massage therapy on the healthy shoulder, he was able to find peace within himself.

It's reasonable to assume that the memory of the emotional experience is stored somewhere in the brain - the system that is specialized in memory handling and remained inaccessible, as many other memories a human being experiencing during the life. But the shoulder cells hold the bookmark or a memory address of where the actual memories of the incident were stored in the brain. Thus by activating the shoulder cell you triggered the process of loading the content of that remote memory in the active memory, causing the aforementioned reaction.

As you can see from this episode, clinical psychology approach alone wouldn't be sufficient, because of the emotional memories carried by the cells of his body. Presently, I receive professional referrals from clinical psychologists.

Dear colleagues, I would like to encourage you to contact clinical psychologists in your neighborhoods and to offer them your services to incorporate massage therapy in their treatments. The Latin word "doctor" means educator. After being involved in many cases,at US it is clear to me that we should educate not only our clients about the power and importance of massage therapy, but also other health care practitioners.

www.medicalmassage-edu.com

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(spacing is not working right; I'll draw extra lines to separate points as a result)

 

"BTW.and if you wil lread careful my sentences that you offerd

than you will find that I am expressing "maybe opinion" that the memory of the emotional experience is stored somewhere in the brain."

 

Actually, what you said was this:

But the shoulder cells hold the bookmark or a memory address of where the actual memories of the incident were stored in the brain. Thus by activating the shoulder cell you triggered the process of loading the content of that remote memory in the active memory, causing the aforementioned reaction.

As you can see from this episode, clinical psychology approach alone wouldn't be sufficient, because of the emotional memories carried by the cells of his body.

I don't see "maybe" in there at all; I see a definite assertion that cells carry memory.
=========================================================================
"just spend a little bit more time on this area and you will reach better and sustained results."
=========================================================================
So are you actually saying that what I have observed in 20 years in the clinic and 11 years as a professional anatomist don't count, unless and until it matches your claims? What do you know about the quality of my results, anyway?

Boris Prilutsky said:
Raven.good for you that you agree in regards of emotional storages. The title of this article is "

"Body Cells Carry Emotional Memory"

as long I can remember it is for last 39 years I knew about this theory, and probably someone once named it this way.

Professional discussions is about learning, and to  argue .BTW.and if you wil lread careful my sentences that you offerd

than you will find that I am expressing "maybe opinion" that the memory of the emotional experience is stored somewhere in the brain.you just repeated the same only insisting that this negative emotions stored in memory centers.on this I do not argue with you because I don't know where they are stored. What is important that during soft tissue mobilization somehow we stimulating them out. I am educator and proposing useful material.the bottom line to pay attention and if you will discover expressions as I described  in my previous reply,just spend a little bit more time on this area and you will reach better and sustained results.

Boris stated in article:It's reasonable to assume that the memory of the emotional experience is stored somewhere in the brain - the system that is specialized in memory handling and remained inaccessible, as many other memories a human being experiencing during the life. But the shoulder cells hold the bookmark or a memory address of where the actual memories of the incident were stored in the brain. Thus by activating the shoulder cell you triggered the process of loading the content of that remote memory in the active memory, causing the aforementioned reaction.

 



Ravensara Travillian said:

Yes, I have spent a lot of time in the treatment room, and since a large part of my practice has been with refugees and wounded vets, I have been present on many occasions where emotional release has occurred.

 

I don't doubt at all that they are expressing negative emotions; I am asking why you claim the memories of those emotions are in the cells, rather than in the mind or brain.

 

I assume by phantom syndrome, you mean phantom limb syndrome, where someone loses say, a leg, and still feels pain in it? That is a perfect example of how the brain processes pain information, and then projects it back out to the (now-missing) limb. There are no cells there any longer to hold memories, but that doesn't matter--the brain works as it normally does, receiving information, putting it together, and then sending it out to where it is perceived by us to be. This is not a mysterious process, and requires no inexplicable "memory" on the part of structures with no nervous system of their own. why is it any different for non-phantom-limb syndrome?

 

and although you brushed it off with "no matter", my question was 100% serious--if it is the cells in the body that contain memories, rather than the brain, then those cells are replaced many times over a person's lifetime. When the cells die, and get broken down, how do the memories of old trauma get transmitted to the new cells replacing them, which did not exist at the time of the trauma? 

 

cheers,

 

Raven


Boris Prilutsky said:

Raven.this is clinical discussion. Phenomenal of emotional releases as I described is a reality from treatment room.

If you spent enough time in treatment room as a massage therapists most likely you witnessed  it or possibly didn't   paid enough attention for not significant muscular constrictions at the time of touch, shortening of breath est. A lot of things we don't know to explain, but if it works then we should continue to use it for our clients advantage. In my previous post you asked how we will know that it will work or working. If providing somebody with therapy

and client for  no reason for it(no pain est.) start crying then it means that he/she releasing negative emotions, and during the next few procedures A) will not cry B) will report"feeling better". when you massaging any part of the body and at that time like a reflex client constricting muscles, not reporting pain, you will continue to work on it, and during few  next times clients will not constrict muscles,and with time will report, that she experienced less anxieties,improved quality of sleep, positive mood changes, est. this is the desired  clinical outcome.and who cares where this emotions where stored. Did you hear about sensitization/Phantom syndrome.where this memories stored and all life.stored for life and no matter as you stated"Since cells are replaced many times over during a person's lifetime, how do the old cells being replaced hand their "memories" over to the cells replacing them?" they still there.

Best wishes.

Boris

Raven.You wrote:"just spend a little bit more time on this area and you will reach better and sustained results."
=========================================================================
So are you actually saying that what I have observed in 20 years in the clinic and 11 years as a professional anatomist don't count, unless and until it matches your claims? What do you know about the quality of my results, anyway?"
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
I'm hoping that from  any of my post practitioners will take something useful. If some already know,then they know.
this sentence :""just spend a little bit more time on this area and you will reach better and sustained results."
I never addressed to you, and never questioned your capability in treatment.
To me your statements looks like non practical because if you have something to share from your observation and experiences and beliefs,but on subject that we discussing, then just share with others including me. But obviously you choosed to act differently.I hope that all this misunderstanding, and somehow we will be able to communicate in much more friendly and nondestructive manner. Nondestructive I mean, to discuss subjects: is a negative emotion storage in the body is real phenomenon that we witnessing in treatment room. This is is  was the main question. And not where it is stored. No one's know where it's stored and this is not important for this practical  professional discussion.
Best wishes.
Boris

To provide information to clients we have too. And actually this discussion supposed to give practitioners additional idea to explain existent theory about emotional storage in our body and possibility to release it during massage procedures. In professional discussion and in order not to be destructive one have to be clinical practitioner.

Here Christopher’s last attempt to distract productivity of our discussion

he wrote: Given that Raven is both an experienced massage therapist and an anatomist, that's a pretty condescending reply.

 

Her question is a good one, and it highlights the fact that memories are not stored within individual cells.  This is why there is not a single neuroscientist, cognitive psychologist, or anatomist working in their field who endorses that position.”

Our discussion was about storage of  negative emotional memories in the human body and possibility to cause release of it by means of massage. Who cares if” single neuroscientist, cognitive psychologist, or anatomist working in their field who endorses that position.”

You personally stated that you were witnessing this phenomenon in treatment room, I have no doubt of it, the other  practitioners facing  it . It is important to discuss  i twith no intentional destructions.

Wasn't it attempt by Christopher to destruct our professional conversation by talking on the endorsement by neuroscientist, cognitive psychologist, or anatomist working in their field who endorses that position.”? Absolutely obvious, and not first-time.the matter-of-fact instead of continue productive discussion we talking on:"neuroscientist, cognitive psychologist, or anatomist working in their field who endorses that position.”

Best wishes.

Boris



Ravensara Travillian said:

"You cannot have opinion because you are not massage therapist"?

Does that also mean we do not need to provide good and solid information to clients because they are not massage therapists, and therefore cannot have opinions?

 

How does understanding better what we do "depress professional self-esteem"? Are traditional practices to be protected at all costs? In that case, the industry is wasting its money on promoting research literacy.

 

Or is the purpose of research to better understand what it is that we do, and discard things that don't work in favor of promoting what we do that does work? In that case, how does "professional self-esteem" attach to discussing these matters openly and transparently?

 

"Have some respect to yourself"

"just get lost"

 

I thought this site was for massage "professionals", where we could discuss professional issues without getting other people's permission to do so. You can say "just get lost" all you want, but I don't think you have any real authority to dictate who participates in the discussion.

 



Boris Prilutsky said:

Christopher. I was involved in few discussions where You took part of it too.you always asking questions never  expressing your opinion but if you do express opinion then it only in the frame:" I am skeptic""not sure about it" "can you prove it?" I don't blame you you cannot have opinion because you are not massage therapist. My opinion that you also cannot be a principal investigator in massage therapy subjects. Just stop to do it. It is not fair to no one and especially to massage therapy community. Just drop it. Few times I say to you: this is waste of time to discuss with you any issue related to massage therapybut you continue to come back.have some respect to yourself. I am assuming that my discussions not only you and Raven reading, but for some reason looks like most of our community agree with you or you was successful to depress professional self-esteem of our guys by at the time of discussions talking to them categorically. Please check all your discussion and correct me if I am wrong.just get lost.

Christopher A. Moyer said:

Raven.this is clinical discussion. Phenomenal of emotional releases as I described is a reality from treatment room.

If you spent enough time in treatment room

 

Given that Raven is both an experienced massage therapist and an anatomist, that's a pretty condescending reply.

 

Her question is a good one, and it highlights the fact that memories are not stored within individual cells.  This is why there is not a single neuroscientist, cognitive psychologist, or anatomist working in their field who endorses that position.

 

Please check all your discussion and correct me if I am wrong.

Yes, you are wrong about quite a few things.  And when it is pointed out to you that you might be wrong - as when you are asked for the sources of your information about clinical psychology, or about your assertion that memories are stored in cells themselves, you do not bolster your own position with any evidence at all.  You attack the questioner, change the subject, or maintain that you in fact said something else despite the fact that direct quotes of your own writing clearly show that isn't true.

 

You do not like me, and that is fine.  I do not care about that.  But something I do care about is when someone who positions themselves as an educator disseminates bad information.  And note that when I say this, I do not even attempt to say this about things which I know little or nothing about, such as specific massage techniques or strokes.  No, in this case I am limiting myself to discussing things that I know about, and which anyone can check for themselves.  You are presenting yourself as an authority while disseminating information about psychology and neurology that is totally incorrect, and that is a disservice to the profession of massage therapy.

 

-CM

Christopher .once again I will try to explain myself. It's not what I do not like you , but I couldn't stand your attempt to distract discussion about obvious from treatment room phenomenon of negative emotions storage in our body and release of it during massage therapy procedure. You didn't care about this facts  from treatment room, and every time try to distract focus on discussions, by saying show me who's endorsing this theory. Once again, I don't care if somebody endorsed it or not. There is big different between I believe in it,and I know it. I know that body does storage negative  emotional memory that causing significant and constant stress, and destroying health and quality of life of many, many people. And massage therapy is the most effective in stress management including emotions release. This is clinical and scientifically proven fact in regards of balancing sympathetic and parasympathetic activities as well clinical fact in regards of releasing negative emotions. I don't know how important for you to look into this works below, to me this is nice and maybe supported work but do not change the fact that massage therapy does release it. Again no matter if this reference is acceptable to you or not. If this research would present some data denying emotional storage in our bodies it also will not change my opinion because I know it from treatment room and for many years. You're welcome to think that I'm not an educator. Don't take classes from me.LOL. I apologize for saying to you in previous post “get lost”. Really sincerely apologize.

Best wishes.

Boris

1.  The ground breaking research by Candace B. Pert. Ph.D. who in 1997 wrote a well received book called "Molecules of Emotion The Science Behind Mind-Body Medicine" while research professor in the Department of Biophysics and Physiology at Georgetown University School of Medicine that explained the then current advances in understanding.

2.  The Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute [ http://www.sensorimotorpsychotherapy.org/home/index.html ] and the http://www.americanboardofsexology.com/

 

 



Christopher A. Moyer said:

Please check all your discussion and correct me if I am wrong.

Yes, you are wrong about quite a few things.  And when it is pointed out to you that you might be wrong - as when you are asked for the sources of your information about clinical psychology, or about your assertion that memories are stored in cells themselves, you do not bolster your own position with any evidence at all.  You attack the questioner, change the subject, or maintain that you in fact said something else despite the fact that direct quotes of your own writing clearly show that isn't true.

 

You do not like me, and that is fine.  I do not care about that.  But something I do care about is when someone who positions themselves as an educator disseminates bad information.  And note that when I say this, I do not even attempt to say this about things which I know little or nothing about, such as specific massage techniques or strokes.  No, in this case I am limiting myself to discussing things that I know about, and which anyone can check for themselves.  You are presenting yourself as an authority while disseminating information about psychology and neurology that is totally incorrect, and that is a disservice to the profession of massage therapy.

 

-CM

"Christopher .once again I will try to explain myself. It's not what I do not like you , but I couldn't stand your attempt to distract discussion about obvious from treatment room phenomenon of negative emotions storage in our body and release of it during massage therapy procedure. You didn't care about this facts  from treatment room, and every time try to distract focus on discussions, by saying show me who's endorsing this theory. Once again, I don't care if somebody endorsed it or not."

 

Boris, if neuroanatomy and neurophysiology do not work the way you claim they do, asking what the evidence is for what you claim as true is not a distraction. It lies at the very heart of the discussion. Students and clients trust us to know what we're doing; every time we make extravagant counterfactual claims, we damage that trust. The least we can do is show on what basis we claim what we do.

 

"I apologize for saying to you in previous post “get lost”. Really sincerely apologize."

 

I actually found what you said to Chris about damaging professional self-esteem by his asking you to show your evidence much more interesting.

 

Do we have a professional investment in rejecting evidence if it doesn't show what we want to be true?



Boris Prilutsky said:

Christopher .once again I will try to explain myself. It's not what I do not like you , but I couldn't stand your attempt to distract discussion about obvious from treatment room phenomenon of negative emotions storage in our body and release of it during massage therapy procedure. You didn't care about this facts  from treatment room, and every time try to distract focus on discussions, by saying show me who's endorsing this theory. Once again, I don't care if somebody endorsed it or not. There is big different between I believe in it,and I know it. I know that body does storage negative  emotional memory that causing significant and constant stress, and destroying health and quality of life of many, many people. And massage therapy is the most effective in stress management including emotions release. This is clinical and scientifically proven fact in regards of balancing sympathetic and parasympathetic activities as well clinical fact in regards of releasing negative emotions. I don't know how important for you to look into this works below, to me this is nice and maybe supported work but do not change the fact that massage therapy does release it. Again no matter if this reference is acceptable to you or not. If this research would present some data denying emotional storage in our bodies it also will not change my opinion because I know it from treatment room and for many years. You're welcome to think that I'm not an educator. Don't take classes from me.LOL. I apologize for saying to you in previous post “get lost”. Really sincerely apologize.

Best wishes.

Boris

1.  The ground breaking research by Candace B. Pert. Ph.D. who in 1997 wrote a well received book called "Molecules of Emotion The Science Behind Mind-Body Medicine" while research professor in the Department of Biophysics and Physiology at Georgetown University School of Medicine that explained the then current advances in understanding.

2.  The Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute [ http://www.sensorimotorpsychotherapy.org/home/index.html ] and the http://www.americanboardofsexology.com/

 

 



Christopher A. Moyer said:

Please check all your discussion and correct me if I am wrong.

Yes, you are wrong about quite a few things.  And when it is pointed out to you that you might be wrong - as when you are asked for the sources of your information about clinical psychology, or about your assertion that memories are stored in cells themselves, you do not bolster your own position with any evidence at all.  You attack the questioner, change the subject, or maintain that you in fact said something else despite the fact that direct quotes of your own writing clearly show that isn't true.

 

You do not like me, and that is fine.  I do not care about that.  But something I do care about is when someone who positions themselves as an educator disseminates bad information.  And note that when I say this, I do not even attempt to say this about things which I know little or nothing about, such as specific massage techniques or strokes.  No, in this case I am limiting myself to discussing things that I know about, and which anyone can check for themselves.  You are presenting yourself as an authority while disseminating information about psychology and neurology that is totally incorrect, and that is a disservice to the profession of massage therapy.

 

-CM

Christopher .once again I will try to explain myself. It's not what I do not like you , but I couldn't stand your attempt to distract discussion about obvious from treatment room phenomenon of negative emotions storage in our body and release of it during massage therapy procedure. You didn't care about this facts  from treatment room,

 

I do care about that, and find it interesting, but it wasn't what I was asking about.  I worded my question very specifically, and quoted you directly, when posing my question.

 

and every time try to distract focus on discussions, by saying show me who's endorsing this theory. Once again, I don't care if somebody endorsed it or not.

 

And once more, you are shifting the goalposts.  You stated, unequivocally, that "many clinical psychologists" view emotions as stored in cells.  I asked who some of these many clinical psychologists were, and noted that there is NO mention of cellular memory in the most recent edition of the most widely-used textbook on Psychology, which includes a comprehensive 40-page chapter entitled "Memory".  I also pointed out that the premier journal in the field, the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, contains not a single instance of the phrase "cellular memory" anywhere, as best I could determine.  This leads me to believe the premise with which you opened your post.  The truth is that hardly any and possibly no clinical psychologists say what you claim.

 

At that point, if you'd simply said 'hmm, maybe you're right, I might've assumed something incorrectly' and then gone on to posit a different theory, e.g., that the body sometimes behaves as if emotions are stored in distinct anatomical locations, I could've easily agreed with that and let it go.  But you continue to insist, in two different posts now that you are correct about something for which there is no evidence.  And I think that's a problem.

 

There is big different between I believe in it,and I know it. I know that body does storage negative  emotional memory that causing significant and constant stress, and destroying health and quality of life of many, many people. And massage therapy is the most effective in stress management including emotions release. This is clinical and scientifically proven fact in regards of balancing sympathetic and parasympathetic activities

 

This may mean nothing to you, since you seem to believe that I should conduct no massage therapy research whatsoever, but I'm going to mention it anyway.  The evidence that massage balances the PNS and SNS is far from scientifically proven.  In fact, I've got data produced in my own lab which my students and I are working with right now, which shows pretty clearly that this old assumption may have to be overturned.

 

as well clinical fact in regards of releasing negative emotions. I don't know how important for you to look into this works below, to me this is nice and maybe supported work but do not change the fact that massage therapy does release it. Again no matter if this reference is acceptable to you or not. If this research would present some data denying emotional storage in our bodies it also will not change my opinion

 

And that statement right there is problematic for someone who promotes themselves as an educator.  To say that you are not even open to changing your position even if provided with counter-evidence is no different than saying you are willing to teach your students incorrect information.

 

because I know it from treatment room and for many years. You're welcome to think that I'm not an educator. Don't take classes from me.LOL. I apologize for saying to you in previous post “get lost”. Really sincerely apologize.

 

I accept your apology.

 

Best wishes.

Boris

1.  The ground breaking research by Candace B. Pert. Ph.D. who in 1997 wrote a well received book called "Molecules of Emotion The Science Behind Mind-Body Medicine" while research professor in the Department of Biophysics and Physiology at Georgetown University School of Medicine that explained the then current advances in understanding.

 

I have read this book.  Pert is a very accomplished scientist who deserves major credit for helping to discover the opiate receptor.  The first half of the book is a very interesting account of a scientific career.  Somewhere about halfway into the book, though, she details how she left science, and she begins to champion some very nonscientific ideas.  To say that the book was well-received is misleading.  It may have sold well, but no working scientists are consulting it as a reference for how the body produces emotions or stores memories.


2.  The Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute [ http://www.sensorimotorpsychotherapy.org/home/index.html ] and the http://www.americanboardofsexology.com/

 

I'll familiarize myself with these when I get a chance.  And just to be very clear, I never disputed the fact that stress and negative emotions can interfere with sexual health and optimal sexual functioning.  I take issue with the simplified mechanism that you propose.

thanks for accepting my apology. I do appreciate it.

You said"You stated, unequivocally, that "many clinical psychologists" view emotions as stored in cells."

Couldn't find me writing  it.can you pinpoint. Thanks.

thanks for accepting my apology. I do appreciate it.

You said"You stated, unequivocally, that "many clinical psychologists" view emotions as stored in cells."

Couldn't find me writing  it.can you pinpoint. Thanks.

 

Sure:

 

"According to many experts in clinical psychology, sexual pathology and many other adjacent fields the main obstacle to couples’ inability to reach top sexual satisfaction, to discover the maximum of what sexual act can offer is stress and emotional memory that body cells carry."

My goodness Christopher.it is total misunderstanding not significant should I say but misunderstanding. I'm really sorry, energy was not productive spended.

Here I have to give a bid  explanations and interpretations of this sentence.

It is actually out there many articles, as well advertising for  therapies not by massage to improve quality of sexual life by managing stress.

Because I am positive 100% that massage therapy is the most powerful methodology in stress management, and especially in cases  of  sexual live improvement.

Why?

because:” Sexual responses are regulated by the mutual activities of sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of nervous systems, but under domination influence of parasympathetic division as well as involvement of somatic innervations. Even considering the difference in female and male reflex pathways before intimacy, and at the time of sexual activities, the function of autonomic nervous system is similar. That includes blood vessel dilation, which causes penis and clitoris erections, vaginal smooth muscles contractions at the time of orgasm, as well as smooth muscles constrictions at the time of ejaculations.”

>>>>>>

None of available methods more powerful than massage to balancing activities of sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of nervous systems. I know  I am repeating myself but at this moment this is important.

>>>>>>>>

“ Also it is important to mention that under stress our skeletal muscles demonstrating higher muscular tensions, which in turn limit the range of muscular constrictions. Contractions of the skeletal pelvic muscles are accompanied orgasm in both sexes, and unless these muscles relaxed, it is hard to expect full sexual satisfactions.”

>>>>>>

Non methodology better relaxing muscles than massage.

>>>>>>

The bigger but not significant  misunderstanding  is this sentence one sentence.

“According to many experts in clinical psychology, sexual pathology and many other adjacent fields the main obstacle to couples’ inability to reach top sexual satisfaction, to discover the maximum of what sexual act can offer is stress and emotional memory that body cells carry.. “

Maybe I should exclude” and emotional memory that body cells carry.”

If this what you meant  in your comments, then I am taking this back. Please see this sentence

Without “and emotional memory that body cells carry.” In any case lately in my article I did explain it.

I'm glad that finally I understood what did you try to get from me.

If this misunderstanding on my end then you right my apology for all this commotions.

If you posted your questions not really related to content and message of article I also don't care

because final understanding this is what matter.I really couldn't understand what do you want.

Best wishes.

Boris

 

 

Well shucks, and here I thought I had dedicated 2 years of my life to learning from and working with one of the best researchers in the field.  Maybe I should have gone to Miami instead of Wisconsin...

 

;)

 

But in all seriousness, Boris, while you may not appreciate Chris asking questions, he has done more for the massage therapy research field than many other people, including publishing two of the most (if not just *the most*) rigorous quantitative reviews in existance (in MT).  You really think he's not pro massage? Check Google Scholar.  You might learn something from the many outstanding articles he's written.

 

(Just in case you need the link http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&q=christopher+moyer+and...)

 

Boris Prilutsky said:

Christopher. I was involved in few discussions where You took part of it too.you always asking questions never  expressing your opinion but if you do express opinion then it only in the frame:" I am skeptic""not sure about it" "can you prove it?" I don't blame you you cannot have opinion because you are not massage therapist. My opinion that you also cannot be a principal investigator in massage therapy subjects. Just stop to do it. It is not fair to no one and especially to massage therapy community. Just drop it. Few times I say to you: this is waste of time to discuss with you any issue related to massage therapybut you continue to come back.have some respect to yourself. I am assuming that my discussions not only you and Raven reading, but for some reason looks like most of our community agree with you or you was successful to depress professional self-esteem of our guys by at the time of discussions talking to them categorically. Please check all your discussion and correct me if I am wrong.just get lost.

Christopher A. Moyer said:

Raven.this is clinical discussion. Phenomenal of emotional releases as I described is a reality from treatment room.

If you spent enough time in treatment room

 

Given that Raven is both an experienced massage therapist and an anatomist, that's a pretty condescending reply.

 

Her question is a good one, and it highlights the fact that memories are not stored within individual cells.  This is why there is not a single neuroscientist, cognitive psychologist, or anatomist working in their field who endorses that position.

 

Thank you for the link. I found Randomized Controlled Trials of Pediatric Massage: A Review by
Shay Beider1 and Christopher A. Moyer very interesting reading and very thorough. I think much research needs to be done to determine the best modalities in certain situations. But I do not feel that massage that people find helpful but can not be verified should be dispensed with. It simply means keep studying the cause and effect. I think the real issue many of us have  is we are too busy helping people recover from various problems that we are not available for the research studies and controls.

I am content that so many people come to me to recover and so many students seek me to learn the methods. I am all for researchers continuing to study cause and effect with scientific tools. I would like to see more studies of the modalities I use and hopefully that will come. I do not use Swedish for pediatric massage. More attention should be paid, I believe, to Asian Bodywork with a much longer history of reputed results in all fields. Let's not forget that even if it is a placebo effect, if the pain vanishes, it is good.

As for me I will see my clients tomorrow and assist their bodies to heal themselves. For me healing is still an art, not a science. Keep on researching as this also makes some people feel better.

 

Kim Goral said:

Well shucks, and here I thought I had dedicated 2 years of my life to learning from and working with one of the best researchers in the field.  Maybe I should have gone to Miami instead of Wisconsin...

 

;)

 

But in all seriousness, Boris, while you may not appreciate Chris asking questions, he has done more for the massage therapy research field than many other people, including publishing two of the most (if not just *the most*) rigorous quantitative reviews in existance (in MT).  You really think he's not pro massage? Check Google Scholar.  You might learn something from the many outstanding articles he's written.

 

(Just in case you need the link http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&q=christopher+moyer+and...)

 

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